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    About the GO

    Christian Gimenez · Monday, 27 April, 2020 - 20:46

About the GO

Genome Ontology. I can even download the ontologies files!

#Semantic_Web #Ontology #OWL

  • About the GO

    About the GO Mission Statement: The mission of the GO Consortium is to develop an up-to-date, comprehensive, computational model of biological systems, from the molecular level to larger pathways, cellular and organism-level systems.

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    Registro de Makers

    Christian Gimenez · Tuesday, 7 April, 2020 - 14:24

Registro de Makers

Registro de makers con impresoras 3D y su producción para aportar un grano de arena frente a la crisis del COVID-19.

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    Christian Gimenez · Tuesday, 7 April, 2020 - 13:28

    Zoom is malware



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    Zoom is malware

    My wife's company pulled the plug on Zoom today. Hmm, might have something to do with this: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/apr/02/zoom-technology-security-coronavirus-video-conferencing

    people ericbuijs 6 April, 2020

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    Christian Gimenez · Wednesday, 1 April, 2020 - 23:59

    The red noses ICC issue



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    The red noses ICC issue

    I'm still under shock: over the last months, I fought with something I never saw in 20 years of digital art. All started after I installed this new ICC profile sent from a new printer. I copied it along my other ICC profiles as I do usually and at first, all was fine. But after a couple of days something weird happened: all the noses of my characters in artworks started to be glossy and red! (screenshot above) I immediately started to investigate everywhere: the Kra files, LittleCMS updates, my windows compositor until I found something using the ICC profile manager of Krita. The color profiles had something new: the preview indicated the red part of their colorspace area started to expand! Worst, this issue started to propagate to all the ICC profiles I had on my disk! Icc profiles with expanded colorspace in red I had no idea what to do. After sleepless nights to search the web, I found this thread on a forum with a method I never tried before: the quarantine of files. I immediately put it to action before the propagation reaches more files while praying for my art to be back to normal noses. Create a new directory under /home and move them there Then I waited (the period might be different according to your local settings) but it did work! After a couple of days this removed the issue and all my profiles went back to normal. I first symlinked them one by one with special permissions, I also controlled their color temperature one by one and everything went back to normal. I then thought it was important to write this article to warn other artist and here I am now. IMPORTANT: If you see other artists with artworks having glossy red noses; please inform them they might be infected! If everyone does that with their ICC profiles, we might avoid the propagation of red noses in art!

    group_work PepperCarrot 1 April, 2020

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    Christian Gimenez · Monday, 23 March, 2020 - 02:43

    #Manjaro ¿Cansado de compilar drivers porque se actualizo el kernel? ¿no te importa actualizar el núcleo? Probar: `sudo pacman -Syu --ignore 'linux*'`

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    Christian Gimenez · Tuesday, 17 March, 2020 - 14:16 edit

    Paul Schaub: Install Jitsi-Meet alongside ejabberd



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    Paul Schaub: Install Jitsi-Meet alongside ejabberd

    Since the corona virus is forcing many of us into home office there is a high demand for video conference solutions. A popular free and open source tool for creating video conferences similar to Google’s hangouts is Jitsi Meet . It enables you to create a conference room from within your browser for which you can then share a link to your coworkers. No client software is needed at all (except mobile devices). The installation of Jitsi Meet is super straight forward – if you have a dedicated server sitting around. Simply add the jitsi repository to your package manager and (in case of debian based systems) type sudo apt-get install jitsi-meet The installer will guide you through most of the process (setting up nginx / apache, installing dependencies, even do the letsencrypt setup) and in the end you can start video calling! The quick start guide does a better job explaining this than I do. Jitsi Meet is a suite of different components that all play together (see Jitsi Meet manual ). Part of the mix is a prosody XMPP server that is used for signalling. That means if you want to have the simple easy setup experience, your server must not already run another XMPP server. Otherwise you’ll have to do some manual configuration ahead of you. I did that. Since I already run a personal ejabberd XMPP server and don’t have any virtualization tools at hands, I wanted to make jitsi-meet use ejabberd instead of prosody. In the end both should be equally suited for the job. Looking at the prosody configuration file that comes with Jitsi’s bundled prosody we can see that Jitsi Meet requires the XMPP server to serve two different virtual hosts. The file is located under /etc/prosody/conf.d/meet.example.org.cfg.lua VirtualHost "meet.example.org" authentication = "anonymous" ssl = { ... } modules_enabled = { "bosh"; "pubsub"; "ping"; } c2s_require_encryption = falseComponent "conference.meet.example.org" "muc" storage = "memory"admins = { "focus@auth.meet.example.org" }Component "jitsi-videobridge.meet.example.org" component_secret = "SECRET1"VirtualHost "auth.meet.example.org" ssl = { ... } authentication = "internal_plain"Component "focus.meet.example.org" component_secret = "SECRET2" Remember to replace SECRET1 and SECRET2 with secure secrets! There are also some external components that need to be configured. This is where Jitsi Meet plugs into the XMPP server. In my case I don’t want to server 3 virtual hosts with my ejabberd, so I decided to replace auth.meet.jabberhead.tk with my already existing main domain jabberhead.tk which already uses internal authentication. So all I had to do is to add the virtual host meet.jabberhead.tk to my ejabberd.yml and configure it to use anonymous authentication. The ejabberd config file is located under /etc/ejabberd/ejabberd.yml or /opt/ejabberd/conf/ejabberd.yml depending on your ejabberd distribution. hosts: ## serves as main host, as well as auth.meet.jabberhead.tk for focus user - "jabberhead.tk" ## serves as anonymous authentication host for meet.jabberhead.tk - "meet.jabberhead.tk"...host_config: meet.jabberhead.tk: auth_method: anonymous allow_multiple_connections: true anonymous_protocol: both The syntax for external components is quite different for ejabberd than it is for prosody, so it took me some time to get it working. listen: - port: 5280 ip: "::" module: ejabberd_http request_handlers: ## Not sure if this is needed, but by default jitsi-meet uses http-bind for bosh "/http-bind": mod_bosh "/bosh": mod_bosh tls: true protocol_options: 'TLS_OPTIONS' - port: 5275 ip: "::" module: ejabberd_service access: all shaper: fast hosts: "jitsi-videobridge.jabberhead.tk": password: "SECRET1" - port: 5347 module: ejabberd_service hosts: "focus.jabberhead.tk": password: "SECRET2" By re-reading the config files now, I wonder why I ended up placing the focus component under the host focus.jabberhead.tk and not focus.meet.jabberhead.tk , but hey – it works and I’m too scared to touch it again The configuration of the modules was a bit trickier on ejabberd, as the ejabberd config syntax seems to disallow duplicate entries. In this case I had to configure mod_muc for my main domain different than for the meet.jabberhead.tk domain, so I had to move the original mod_muc and mod_muc_admin configuration out of the modules: block and into an append_host_config: block with different settings per domain. append_host_config: jabberhead.tk: modules: ## This is the original muc configuration I used before mod_muc: access: - allow access_admin: - allow: admin access_create: muc_create access_persistent: muc_create access_mam: - allow default_room_options: allow_private_messages: true mam: true persistent: true mod_muc_admin: {} meet.jabberhead.tk: modules: ## This is the config only for meet.jabberhead.tk mod_muc: host: conference.meet.jabberhead.tk mod_muc_admin: {} mod_pubsub , mod_ping and mod_bosh all have to be enabled, but can stay in the global modules: block. Last but not least we have to add the focus user as an admin and also generate (not discussed here) and add certificates for the meet.jabberhead .tk subdomain. certfiles: - ... - "/etc/ssl/meet.jabberhead.tk/cert.pem" - "/etc/ssl/meet.jabberhead.tk/fullchain.pem" - "/etc/ssl/meet.jabberhead.tk/privkey.pem"...acl: admin: user: - "focus@jabberhead.tk" That’s it for the ejabberd configuration. Now we have to configure the other Jitsi Meet components. Lets start with jicofo, the Jitsi Conference Focus component. My /etc/jitsi/jicofo/config file looks as follows. JICOFO_HOST=jabberhead.tkJICOFO_HOSTNAME=jabberhead.tkJICOFO_SECRET=SECRET2JICOFO_PORT=5347JICOFO_AUTH_DOMAIN=jabberhead.tkJICOFO_AUTH_USER=focusJICOFO_AUTH_PASSWORD=SECRET3JICOFO_OPTS=""# Below can be left as is.JAVA_SYS_PROPS=... Respectively the videobridge configuration ( /etc/jitsi/videobridge/config ) looks like this: JVB_HOSTNAME=jabberhead.tkJVB_HOST=localhostJVB_PORT=5275JVB_SECRET=SECRET1## Leave below as originally wasJAVA_SYS_PROPS=... Some changes had to be made to /etc/jitsi/videobridge/sip-communicator.properties : org.jitsi.videobridge.AUTHORIZED_SOURCE_REGEXP=focus@jabberhead.tk/.*org.ice4j.ice.harvest.NAT_HARVESTER_LOCAL_ADDRESS=org.ice4j.ice.harvest.NAT_HARVESTER_PUBLIC_ADDRESS=org.jitsi.videobridge.TCP_HARVESTER_PORT=4443 Now we can wire it all together by modifying the Jitsi Meet config file found under /etc/jitsi/meet/meet.example.org-config.js : var config = { hosts: { domain: 'jabberhead.tk', anonymousdomain: 'meet.jabberhead.tk', authdomain: 'jabberhead.tk', bridge: 'jitsi-videobridge.meet.jabberhead.tk', focus: 'focus.jabberhead.tk', muc: 'conference.meet.jabberhead.tk' }, bosh: '//meet.jabberhead.tk/http-bind', clientNode: 'http://jitsi.org/jitsimeet', focusUserJid: 'focus@jabberhead.tk', testing: { ... }...} Last but not least my nginx host configuration ( /etc/nginx/sites-available/meet.example.org.conf ) where all I changed was the bosh configuration (went from http to https, I heard people say this is not necessary though). server { listen 80; server_name meet.jabberhead.tk; return 301 https://$host$request_uri;}server { listen 443 ssl; server_name meet.jabberhead.tk; ... # BOSH location = /http-bind { proxy_pass https://localhost:5280/http-bind; proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $remote_addr; proxy_set_header Host $http_host; } ...} Finally of course, I also had to register the focus user as an XMPP account: ejabberdctl register focus jabberhead.tk SECRET3 Remember to use a safe password instead of SECRET3 and also stop and disable the bundled prosody! That’s it! I hope this lowers the bar for some to deploy Jitsi Meet next to their already existing ejabberd. Lastly please do not ask me for support, as I barely managed to get this working for myself

    group_work PlanetJabber 16 March, 2020

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