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    Shaving isn’t mere personal hygiene, it’s an art... or it should be

    GadgeteerZA · Sunday, 26 June - 19:59

If you’ve been using an aerosol shaving cream and disposal razor, you’ve certainly left room for improvement. When using the wrong tools, shaving can feel like a painful chore—literally, if nicks, cuts, and razor burn are an issue for you. That’s why true grooming experts recommend a process called “wet shaving”—a little fancier, a little old fashioned, and a lot more satisfying. And getting started only takes a few tools and a little know-how.

Beyond the practical concerns, there’s also value in ritual, and wet shaving can definitely be that for you—a small reprieve in the day, during which time you can carefully focus on executing a task well. Using a fancy shaving cream, a soft shave brush, and your favourite smelling aftershave can make for an enjoyable experience at a minimal cost (though like any other hobby, you can certainly spend more money if you want to).

See https://lifehacker.com/shaving-should-be-a-fancy-ritual-1849090730

#traditionalshaving #wetshaving #shaving

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    Debunking Common Anti-EV Myths: Responsible Sourcing Of Raw Materials

    GadgeteerZA · Monday, 9 May - 11:57 · 1 minute

The creators of the endless flood of anti-EV misinformation often claim to be great environmentalists — “Don’t get me wrong…” is a common beginning to their disingenuous articles and posts. In an ironic sense, there may be some truth to this, because they’re certainly believers in recycling. These anti-EV and anti-renewable energy rants rely on a standard repertoire of myths, most of which have been recirculated since modern EVs began to appear a decade ago — and most have been thoroughly debunked and/or made irrelevant by technological and business developments.

When it comes to battery raw materials, some of the claims of the anti-EV brigade are nonsense (lithium isn’t a fuel, and it isn’t going to become “the new oil”), but some are built around grains of truth. Extracting minerals from the earth always has impacts on local environments and communities. The big bête noire of batteries is cobalt, much of which comes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a war-torn land in which child labour is common.

The linked article expands a bit on what is being done around the issues, with links to what those steps are. Now if only the fossil fuel industry were not as considerate themselves around their extraction of raw materials, transporting, refining, fracking, etc. I see the day coming when, like the cigarette companies were finally unmasked in court, the same day will come for oil executives.

See https://cleantechnica.com/2022/05/08/debunking-common-anti-ev-myths-part-two-responsible-sourcing-of-raw-materials/

#environment #bigoil #myths #EV #rawmaerials

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    Obsidian Markdown Notes Editor to Build Your Personal Knowledge Base Into The Future

    GadgeteerZA · Thursday, 28 April - 16:32

Obsidian is a free (non-commercial use), not open source, text editor and works with open standard Markdown formatting on plain text files.

Apart from quite advanced editing and UI options, I find Obsidian attractive because of its over 500 quality community plugins, and its ability to visually show the relationships between your notes. Recording notes from meetings, or as you are daily learning new things or solving problems, is an excellent way to build your personal knowledge base. Using Markdown format can be fun, and can achieve a lot in terms of readability when you use some of the more advanced features of Markdown formatting.

Despite not being open source, you are not locked into Obsidian, and can use other Markdown editors interchangeably. In my video, I also touch on integrating with NextCloud to sync your notes, and especially some issues that iOS presents for apps.

Watch my video at https://youtu.be/q_4LR76g-jU

#technology #obsidian #markdown #notes #editor

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    What is Ultra Wideband and why it is good for location services?

    GadgeteerZA · Wednesday, 9 June, 2021 - 17:01

If you’ve been following the world of mobile phone technology of late, you may be aware that Apple’s latest IPhones and AirTag locator tags bring something new to that platform. Ultra wideband radios are the new hotness when it comes to cellphones, so just what are they, and what’s in it for those of us who experiment with these things?

The real trick up the sleeve for UWB comes not in its data transfer capabilities but in location services, because it allows the synthesis of extremely short RF pulses on the order of a fraction of a nanosecond by combining frequencies across that wide bandwidth. These pulses can be used for extremely accurate time-of-flight measurements between transmitter and receiver, allowing for the distance between them to be determined to an accuracy of a few centimeters. In a system such as Apple AirTags where a tag is likely to have visibility to more than one UWB-equipped Apple product, it can then be used for triangulation with several sources, and thus for accurate 2D and 3D positioning.

See https://hackaday.com/2021/06/09/what-is-ultra-wideband/

#technology #hardware #RF #ultrawideband #UWB

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    The Decentralized Web of Hate - How and Why Hate Groups Started Using Peer-2-Peer Technology - But P2P Can Be Used For Positive Social Impact Too

    GadgeteerZA · Friday, 14 May, 2021 - 19:41 · 1 minute

Emmi Bevensee, of Rebellious Data, SMAT, and the Centre for Analysis of the Radical Right, has finished the second of Rebellious Data new Research Insights series of deep dives into the critical topics of our time. This report looks at how hate movements are decentralizing using emerging technologies in ways that make them harder to combat. These technologies ask us critical questions about the future of society and the internet but also pose incredible potential to help us along our way.

This was a real growing issue near the end of 2020 and there was a lot of worry that the technology intended for privacy and protection of those feeling marginalised, would in fact be taken over and abused by hate groups. I saw those hate groups making a presence on Aether P2P network, and the debate starting there, but also on Scuttlebutt and RetroShare.

What is different about P2P is that your network and what you see in your feed, consists of who you are linked to and following. So if your 'community' unfollows or blocks problem individuals, they disappear from view. It does not mean they are gone as they can exist in their own community, but a P2P network is not a centralised moderated service liker Twitter or Facebook, and it effectively protects everyone. It also cannot really be shut off as it only exists between individual peers without any central server (hosting) or country managing it.

If the report whets your appetite to try Scuttlebutt and venture down the rabbit hole, I'd suggest trying it via the Planetary mobile app, or Patchwork for desktops.

See https://rebelliousdata.com/p2p/#more-2630

#technology #P2P #SSB #socialnetworks #decentralised

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    Steven Baxter, Matt, ericbuijs

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  • 13 February, 2022 Steven Baxter

    True. But would you also say it is true that a certain amount of hate for the conservative thinking is what caused them to seek their own place elsewhere? But my reason for being here is not at all political; but for the uninterrupted communication with the greater community of people wishing to reach across all borders to build a better world. This is a valiant struggle for survival in a world where previous order has given way to divisions and interrupted service, the obvious solution is decentralization of both communications and energy production.

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    System76’s Launch configurable mechanical keyboard is fully open source hardware and firmware for Linux, MacOS and Windows... At a price

    GadgeteerZA · Friday, 14 May, 2021 - 18:56 · 1 minute

System76 unveiled its first keyboard, which also happens to be the first open-source configurable mechanical keyboard. It is easy to swap out the keys, choose the type of switches (Royals which offer a muted clack, and Jades which produce an addictive click sound), can fully remap the key layout in software, it has RGB lighting, as well as it acts as a high-speed USB hub to plug additional USB devices into it.

That said it is fairly pricey at $285 and may lack the additional keys that gamers like to have (media control keys with volume, macro program keys, and number pad), and in my case I like the actual keycap lettering to be lit through the keys (that allows the RGB lighting in effect to change the "colour of the key" and can be quickly changed per game without mechanically removing the keycaps. It is possible though that in future, transparent keycaps could be available that will anyway achieve this, so it may not be a big drawback.

It is well-built though and has certainly packed some requested features in, and the split spacebar makes better use of space. Being open source hardware there is also a good chance of 3rd party support for keycaps and other features. My Redragon Yama mechanical keyboard for example has limited Linux support for the customisation side and I had to use Windows to program it.

See https://news.itsfoss.com/system76-launch-mechanical-keyboard/

#technology #opensource #hardware #keyboard #system76

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    Geekmark benchmark shows identical hardware faster with Linux than Windows 10

    GadgeteerZA · Saturday, 3 April, 2021 - 14:34 edit

https://upload.movim.eu/files/62f168f3fbecac605d21a105beda461820293db1/2SgRppZGn3R3/Geekbench_benchmarks.png

I have a Windows 10 SSD drive (for two games that would run some 3rd party add-ons under Linux) and a Manjaro Linux SSD drive for booting Linux (all Linux user data sits on a slower HDD). The Windows 10 side is not use for daily use so is a lot cleaner in terms of what (and how much) is installed.

That said, with the same graphics card and normal boot up with what auto starts, the Linux side shows a distinct edge.

Also, for comparison is the benchmark for my Core i7 CPU. The Big difference is the AMD has double the number of cores.

#technology #geekbench #benchmarking #windows #linux

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    Personal Blog Post Title

    GadgeteerZA · Monday, 18 January, 2021 - 13:49

https://upload.movim.eu/files/62f168f3fbecac605d21a105beda461820293db1/YO8mvePVQPHk/conspiracyfolklore1-800x533.jpg

Body text here to just see where this is publicly visible outside of Movim on XMPP...

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    This post is public

    nl.movim.eu

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    Yannv, Timothée Jaussoin, Matt