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    Tell us: have you caught Covid in recent weeks?

    news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 11:04

We’d like to hear from people in the UK about whether you or anyone in your family has tested positive for coronavirus in recent weeks

As part of our coverage of the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK, we would like to hear from people who have tested positive for the virus in recent weeks. Do you know how or where you were infected? What is the situation like now?

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    Premier League 2021-22 preview No 8: Everton

    news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 11:00

Rafael Benítez has two major gaps to bridge: between himself and the fans and between the team and the European places

Guardian writers’ predicted position: 8th (NB: this is not necessarily Andy Hunter’s prediction but the average of our writers’ tips)

Last season’s position: 10th

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    Tell us: how are you affected by the recent changes to the UK travel list?

    news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 10:57

We would like to hear if you are planning a last minute holiday or whether you still have concerns about travelling abroad

Austria, Germany, Latvia, Norway, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia have been added to the green travel list, with millions of Britons who are fully vaccinated able to travel to France and Spain without needing to quarantine on their return to England, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

We would like to hear from those living in those countries, as well as travellers going to those countries.

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    Cyprus’s haunting new underwater sculpture park – in pictures

    news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 10:30

Musan, a gallery of sculpture by Jason deCaires Taylor exploring our relationship with nature, has opened off Ayia Napa

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    What happens when millions – or billions – of sea animals die on one day?

    news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 10:24 · 1 minute

The ‘heat dome’ over the Pacific north-west brought unprecedented death to sealife. And the effects will be felt for years to come

As a marine biologist who has studied the effects of extreme weather events for decades, I expected it would be bad. The ‘heat dome’ brought record high air temperatures to the Pacific north-west, and for the plants and animals living along our extensive coastlines the late June timing could not have been worse. The scorching heatwave coincided with some of the lowest daytime tides of the year, leaving tidal lands exposed to hot air and sun for hours during the hottest part of the day, several days in a row.

And bad it was. In the days immediately after the historic heatwave, I visited shorelines that looked and smelled like death. Mussel, oyster and clam shells open wide with rotting tissue exposed, snails and chitons no longer able to cling to the rock, kelp and surfgrass bleached white and sloughing off dead tissue. Similar scenes were reported throughout the Salish Sea of Washington and British Columbia by scientists, shellfish growers and the general public, with mortality estimates ranging from millions to billions of individuals. We’ve never seen anything quite like this before.

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    We got Ben & Jerry’s to stop selling in Israeli settlements. Here’s how we did it | Mark Hage

    news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 10:24 · 1 minute

The groundswell for Palestinian freedom has reached new levels. It’s only a matter of time before other companies take Ben & Jerry’s lead

On 19 July, Ben & Jerry’s, the celebrated ice cream company based in Vermont, where I live, set off a firestorm after it announced it would no longer allow its ice cream to be sold in Israel’s illegal settlements in the occupied West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and would not renew its licensing agreement with its franchise in Israel beyond next year. The company said that continuing to sell ice cream in the occupied Palestinian territory would be “inconsistent” with its values.

I spent the last decade organizing with fellow activists in Vermont to convince Ben & Jerry’s to end its business in Israel’s settlements. The company’s statement, therefore, was a welcome step towards a more just world. But this principled decision was met with a barrage of baseless accusations of antisemitism from Israeli leaders, along with threats to punish the company using anti-BDS laws that crack down on Americans’ constitutionally protected right to boycott.

Israel is demanding that our elected officials trample our first amendment rights and coerce a private American company to conduct business in a manner exclusively on terms pleasing to Israel’s government and settlers, no matter what that government or its settlers do to Palestinians. This is as outrageous as it sounds.

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    Move over, space. Tech billionaires have a new utopian boondoggle: the ‘metaverse’ | Jessa Crispin

    news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 10:22

Imagine a massive, invisible world that surrounds you but which you cannot see or engage unless you own the correct – expensive – technology

Look at all of our tech billionaires trying to leave the world to evade responsibility for their malevolent influence on it. Anything to avoid being confronted by the workers they exploit or the victims of the ethnic and religious clashes facilitated by their platforms. Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson are flinging themselves into space; Elon Musk is burrowing into the earth; now Mark Zuckerberg is retreating into a virtual “ metaverse ”.

Related: Revealed: the Facebook loophole that lets world leaders deceive and harass their citizens

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    Borges and Me by Jay Parini review – around Scotland in a Morris Minor

    news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 10:00 · 1 minute

A brilliantly unlikely travel caper lovingly recalls a road trip with a literary giant in yellow satin pyjamas

Jorge Luis Borges’s short story “Borges and I” is typical of the writer. Erudite and elliptical, succinct and self-referential, passionate and puzzling. In just a few closely packed pages, the Argentinian essayist and master storyteller links the prose of Robert Louis Stevenson with the soul of Julius Caesar, via London brothels and arched entrance halls, past strumming guitars and sword-slain kings, before ending at the feet of God himself. “I have dreamt the world as you dreamt your work, my Shakespeare, and among the forms in my dream are you, who like myself are many and no one.” So speaks the Lord from a whirlwind. Or is it Borges from his desk? Either way, “discuss”.

In this endearing, joyous, sharply written book, Jay Parini sets out to do precisely that: to take up his pen and discuss Borges, a winner of the Nobel prize and a Latin American literary giant. Despite its deceptively simple prose, Borges’s work defies ready explanation or – at times – even ready understanding. He took pleasure in flummoxing. Mercifully and rather marvellously, Parini embarks on his task not as a critic but as an actor. In classic Borgesian style, he opts to write himself into his own drama. Borges and Parini, master and student, driving around the Highlands of Scotland in a battered candy-red Morris Minor, the one blind, the other “shy and often terrified”, both lost in their own mazes, both open to the world.

Parini, a US novelist, academic and literary biographer, is not writing from a blank page. Fifty years ago, as a draft-dodging doctoral student in St Andrews, he met Borges in the flesh. The writer was briefly visiting the UK to collect a prize and give various lectures. He came to Scotland, in small part, to meet a certain Mr Singleton, a specialist in Anglo-Saxon riddles from Inverness. When Borges’s host was called away at short notice, Parini bravely stepped into his shoes as guide and aide. Thus began the start of a riotous, week-long jaunt through the Scottish hinterland.

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