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  • 14 February DebXWoody

    Es sind einfach zu viele,...

  • De chevron_right

    Updated Debian 10: 10.8 released

    pubsub.slavino.sk / debian_news · Saturday, 6 February - 00:00

The Debian project is pleased to announce the eighth update of its stable distribution Debian 10 (codename buster ). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

Značky: #Debian

  • Ar chevron_right

    Ubuntu Core 20 adds secure boot with hardware-backed encryption

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 2 February - 22:26

You might draw a fairly similar schematic diagram to give someone a simplified idea of how a traditional Linux distribution is put together—but it wouldn

Enlarge / You might draw a fairly similar schematic diagram to give someone a simplified idea of how a traditional Linux distribution is put together—but it wouldn't be as close to literal accuracy as this Ubuntu Core diagram is. (credit: Canonical )

Canonical released Ubuntu Core 20 today, which is now available for download. If you're already familiar with Ubuntu Core 20, the standout new feature is added device security with secure boot, full-disk encryption, and secure device recovery baked in. If you're not familiar with Ubuntu Core yet... read on!

The key difference between regular Ubuntu and Ubuntu Core is the underlying architecture of the system. Traditional Linux distributions rely mostly on traditional package systems— deb , in Ubuntu's case—while Ubuntu Core relies almost entirely on Canonical's relatively new snap package format.

Ubuntu Core also gets a full 10 years of support from Canonical, rather than the five years traditional Ubuntu LTS releases get. But it's a bit more difficult to get started with, since you need an Ubuntu SSO account to even log into a new Ubuntu Core installation in the first place.

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  • Pl chevron_right

    qemu-sbuild-utils merged into sbuild

    pubsub.slavino.sk / planetdebian · Thursday, 28 January - 10:00

qemu-sbuild-utils have been merged into sbuild and are now shipped as package sbuild-qemu . The executables have been renamed from qemu-sbuild-* to sbuild-qemu-* , to be consisent with the other utilities provided by sbuild.

I may or may not have botched the transitional dummy package, but as the original package never migrated to testing (this was deliberate) and popcon was low, I'm confident that people will manage.

sbuild-qemu depends on the recently uploaded vdbm2 , which added support for arm64, armhf, and ppc64el images. This is really exciting, as this means that sbuild-qemu and autopkgtest will soon be able to build for and test on most of the officially supported architectures, all from one host machine. MRs to enable these new features in autopkgtest have already been filed by Ryutaro Matsumoto. Support for the armel architecture is being discussed; support for the MIPS architectures is a more complicated issue, as they don't use GRUB.

I'd like to thank Johannes Schauer for reaching out, initiating discussion, and collaborating on this merge!


Značky: #Debian

  • Pl chevron_right

    Compiling and installing the Gentoo Linux kernel on emerge without genkernel

    pubsub.slavino.sk / planetdebian · Thursday, 28 January - 09:45 · 1 minute

Gentoo emerges of sys-kernel/gentoo-sources will nicely install the current kernel into /usr/src/linux-* but it will not compile them.

The Gentoo wiki kernel documentation has a script snippet to automate the kernel build with genkernel .

I do not like to use genkernel as it brings in lots of firmware files to build initrds that are not needed on virtual hardware. It also makes building the kernel slower.

So, the plain approach:

Make emerge sys-kernel/gentoo-sources symlink the latest kernel to /usr/src/linux so we can find it easily:

echo "sys-kernel/gentoo-sources symlink" >> / etc / portage / package.use / gentoo-sources

Create /etc/portage/env/sys-kernel/gentoo-sources with the following:

post_pkg_postinst ( ) {
CURRENT_KV =$ ( uname -r )
unset ARCH
if [ [ -f " ${EROOT:-/} usr/src/linux- ${CURRENT_KV} /.config" ] ] ; then
cp -n " ${EROOT:-/} usr/src/linux- ${CURRENT_KV} /.config" " ${EROOT:-/} usr/src/linux/.config"
cd " ${EROOT:-/} usr/src/linux/" && \
make olddefconfig && \
make -j5 && make modules_install && make install && \
grub-mkconfig -o / boot / grub / grub.cfg
fi
}

This will compile the next kernel on the basis of the config of the currently running kernel, install the modules and the kernel bzImage and update grub so it knows about the new kernel for the next reboot.

If you forget to unset ARCH the Linux build system will complain like:

Makefile:583: arch/amd64/Makefile: No such file or directory
make: *** No rule to make target 'arch/amd64/Makefile'.  Stop.

You can test the new magic by re-emerging the latest kernel, e.g. currently emerge =sys-kernel/gentoo-sources-5.4.80-r1 :


Značky: #Debian

  • Pl chevron_right

    2020 in Fiction

    pubsub.slavino.sk / planetdebian · Wednesday, 27 January - 16:24 · 2 minutes

Cover for Susanna Clarke
Cover for Emily St. John Mandel

I managed to read 31 "books" in 2020. I'm happy with that. I thought the Pandemic would prevent me reaching my goal (30), since I did most of my reading on the commute to the Newcastle office, pre-pandemic. Somehow I've managed to compensate.

I started setting a goal for books read per year in 2012 when I started to use goodreads . Doing so started to influence the type of reading I do (which is the reason I stopped my Interzone subscription in 2014, although I resumed it again sometime afterwards). Once I realised that I've been a bit more careful to ensure setting a goal was a worthwhile thing to do and not just another source of stress in my life.

Two books I read were published in 2020. The first was Robert Galbraith's (a.k.a. J K Rowling's) Troubled Blood , the fifth (and largest) in the series of crime novels featuring Cormoran Strike (and the equally important Robin Ellacott). Nowadays Rowling is a controversial figure, but I'm not writing about that today, or the book itself, in much detail: briefly, it exceeded expectations, and my wife and I really enjoyed it.

The other was Susanna Clarke's Piranesi : an utterly fantastic modern-fantasy story, quite short, completely different to her successful debut novel Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell . I really loved this book, partly because it appeals to my love of fantasy geography, but also because it is very well put together, with a strong sense of the value of people's lives.

A couple of the other books I read were quite Pandemic-appropriate. I tore through Josh Malerman's Bird Box , a fast-paced post-apocalyptic style horror/suspense story. The appeal was mostly in the construction and delivery: the story itself was strong enough to support the book at the length that it is, but I don't really feel it could have lasted much longer, and so I've no idea how the new sequel ( Malorie ) will work.

The other was Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel. This was a story about a group of travelling musicians in a post-apocalyptic (post-pandemic) North America. A cast of characters all revolve around their relationship (or six degrees of separation) to an actor who died just prior to the Pandemic. The world-building in this book was really strong, and I felt sufficiently invested in the characters that I would love to read more about them in another book. However, I think that (although I'm largely just guessing here), in common with Bird Box , the setting was there to support the novel and the ideas that the author wanted to get across, and so I (sadly) doubt she will return to it.

Finally I read a lot of short fiction. I'll write more about that in a separate blog post.


Značky: #Debian

  • Pl chevron_right

    Installing System Rescue (CD) to a flash drive

    pubsub.slavino.sk / planetdebian · Wednesday, 27 January - 12:47 · 1 minute

System Rescue , the project formerly known as System Rescue CD , has moved from being based on Gentoo to being built on Arch Linux packages.

With this their ISO layout changed substantially so when updating my trusty recue USB flash drive, I could not just update the kernel, initrd and the root filesystem image as I had typically done every other year before.

The "Installing on a USB memory stick" documentation is good for Windows (use Rufus , it's nice) but rather useless for Linux. They recommend a dd or the fancy graphical version of that, called usbimager .

I much prefer to have a flash drive that I can write to over an image of a CD (ISO) written 1:1 onto the flash media.

The basic idea is to use the bulk of the System Rescue ISO contents but amend these with your own grub and syslinux so they work as intended over the supplied ones that are bound to the ISO layout a bit too much.

I did this on Debian Buster but with some adjustments to paths and what packages to install, any recent Linux distribution should do:

Continue reading "Installing System Rescue (CD) to a flash drive"

Značky: #Debian