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    Dell spins off $64 billion VMware as it battles debt hangover

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Monday, 1 November - 15:43

Dell spins off $64 billion VMware as it battles debt hangover

Enlarge (credit: Bloomberg | Getty Images)

PC pioneer Michael Dell is set to cap his climb back to the top of the computing world on Monday with one of the largest corporate spin-offs.

Dell Technologies will shed its 81 percent stake in publicly traded VMware, creating an independent software company with a stock market value of nearly $64 billion. Dell’s remaining hardware operations have an implied value of $33 billion, based on its latest share price.

The transaction, first disclosed in April, completes an eight-year saga in which the Texan entrepreneur turned his $3.8 billion interest in an out-of-favor PC maker into a personal stake in a broader data center hardware and software empire worth $40 billion.

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    Parallels Desktop 17 is here and ready to run Windows 11 on M1 Macs

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 10 August - 20:41

Parallels Desktop 17 has arrived with support for macOS Monterey and Windows 11. Further, the popular virtualization software for Macs is now a universal binary, making deployment a little less complicated for many IT professionals.

Note that you can only run ARM versions of Windows (10 or 11) on Macs with Apple Silicon chips like the M1. Both Windows 10 and 11 for ARM are available as Insider Preview builds. On the other hand, Parallels can run versions of Windows going back as far as XP if you're running it on an Intel Mac. A number of Linux distros are also supported, though Intel Macs gain access to more of those than M1 Macs do.

If you have access to those Insider Preview builds, you can run most Windows applications on your M1 Mac, Parallels' developers say, because Windows on ARM can run both 32-bit and, more recently, 64-bit x86 applications. That said, even on machines it's designed to run on, Windows on ARM can be occasionally fussy about x64 apps. So your mileage will likely vary depending on what you're trying to do.

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    Here’s what you’ll need to upgrade to Windows 11

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 25 June, 2021 - 20:05

Since Microsoft's announcement of Windows 11 yesterday, one concern has reverberated around the web—what's this about a Trusted Platform Module requirement?

Windows 11 is the first Windows version to require a TPM, and most self-built PCs (and cheaper, home-targeted OEM PCs) don't have a TPM module on board. Although this requirement is a bit of a mess, it's not as onerous as millions of people have assumed. We'll walk you through all of Windows 11's announced requirements, including TPM—and make sure to note when all this is likely to be a problem.

General hardware requirements

Although Windows 11 does bump general hardware requirements up some from Windows 10's extremely lenient minimums, it will still be challenging to find a PC that doesn't meet most of these specifications. Here's the list:

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    iXsystems launches new hyperconverged infrastructure appliances

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 20 October, 2020 - 12:00 · 1 minute

There

Enlarge / There's a lot to unpack in this infographic, which serves as a pretty concise description of what TrueNAS SCALE is and does—or will do, when it's completely finished. (credit: iXsystems )

Today, storage vendor iXsystems is launching a new R-series hyperconverged infrastructure appliance for its TrueNAS product line—and the first beta release of TrueNAS SCALE, a Debian Linux-based version of the TrueNAS storage distribution.

The new R-series appliances are designed to run either traditional, FreeBSD-based TrueNAS, or the new Debian-based TrueNAS SCALE. The series launches with four models—all rack-mounted—ranging from the 1U, 16-bay TrueNAS R10 to the up to 12U, 52 bay TrueNAS R50. All four models offer Ethernet connectivity up to dual 100GbE, as well as optional dual 32Gb Fibre Channel and Intel Xeon CPUs. The three larger models are expandable via separate JBOD shelves as well.

TrueNAS itself is an OpenZFS-based storage distribution, which can be purchased preinstalled on NAS hardware or installed by users on their own generic PC equipment. It offers users the rich feature set of the ZFS filesystem—including block-level checksums and data healing, advanced storage topologies, atomic COW snapshots, rapid asymmetric replication, and more —along with a broad range of network sharing protocols, including SMB, NFS, sFTP, and iSCSI.

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    Windows 10 machines running on ARM will be able to emulate x64 apps soon

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Thursday, 1 October, 2020 - 20:26

Windows laptops and convertibles running ARM aren't exactly the bulk of the market at this point, but there are several of them there—including Microsoft's own updated Surface Pro X , which was just announced today.

One of the reasons that not every consumer has made the plunge is that running traditional x86 apps on these Windows 10 ARM machines poses significant limitations. Among the biggest: there's no support at all for running 64-bit x86 applications in emulation, only 32-bit.

Today, Microsoft announced in a long-winded blog post that that limitation will soon change, as emulation of 64-bit Windows applications is going into a public-testing phase soon. That addresses one of the biggest complaints about the platform—complaints that have only grown as more popular applications have converted to 64-bit-only as the months have gone by.

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    Upgrading MySQL in a Container

    pubsub.slavino.sk / warlord0blog · Friday, 3 July, 2020 - 07:51 edit

Upgrading MySQL 5.5 to 5.7 in a docker container set caused me some trouble. Setting the tag to 5.7.30 was all well and good but when I fired up the container MySQL would stop immediately. Looking at the log I found The table is probably corrupted and references to run mysql_upgrade which I was expecting &ellipsisRead the full post »

Značky: #Linux, #Virtualization, #mysql, #Linux