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    A history of ARM, part 1: Building the first chip

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 23 September - 15:47

A history of ARM, part 1: Building the first chip

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty Images)

It was 1983, and Acorn Computers was on top of the world. Unfortunately, trouble was just around the corner.

The small UK company was famous for winning a contract with the British Broadcasting Corporation to produce a computer for a national television show. Sales of its BBC Micro were skyrocketing and on pace to exceed 1.2 million units.

But the world of personal computers was changing. The market for cheap 8-bit micros that parents would buy to help kids with their homework was becoming saturated. And new machines from across the pond, like the IBM PC and the upcoming Apple Macintosh, promised significantly more power and ease of use. Acorn needed a way to compete, but it didn’t have much money for research and development.

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    Almost two years after Apple’s M1 launch, Microsoft Teams goes native

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Thursday, 4 August - 19:22

Microsoft Teams running on a Mac.

Enlarge / Microsoft Teams running on a Mac. (credit: Microsoft)

Microsoft has announced plans to roll out an Apple Silicon-native version of Microsoft Teams, but the release isn't going to happen overnight.

In a blog post on its website, Microsoft claims the update will offer "a significant boost in performance" to users of Macs with Apple's M1, M1 Pro, M1 Max, M1 Ultra, and M2 chips.

Teams has just been running as an Intel app via Rosetta 2 on M1 Macs since the beginning of the Apple Silicon transition in 2020. Direct competitors Zoom and Slack have offered native Apple Silicon support since December 2020 and February 2021, respectively.

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    Immortalis : comment ARM veut faire décoller le ray tracing sur mobile

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Thursday, 30 June - 08:00

arm-immortalis-gpu-158x105.jpg ARM Immortalis

ARM renouvelle sa flotte de cœur CPU et inaugure une nouvelle famille de GPU. Appelé Immortalis-G715, ARM prépare la prochaine révolution sur mobile en prenant en charge le ray tracing matériel. Explications.

Immortalis : comment ARM veut faire décoller le ray tracing sur mobile

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    Apple announces its next-gen M2 chip, promising 18% faster performance than M1

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Monday, 6 June - 18:00

Apple announces its next-gen M2 chip, promising 18% faster performance than M1

Enlarge (credit: Apple)

CUPERTINO, Calif.—Exactly two years after Apple first announced the M1, its direct successor has finally been revealed. Apple executives and product managers presented details about the new chip—predictably dubbed the M2—during its annual developer conference.

The M2 is an improvement in many ways on the M1, but it's not meant to one-up the higher-end M1 Pro, M1 Max, or M1 Ultra seen in the MacBook Pro and Mac Studio. M2 Pro, Max, and Ultra variants have higher CPU and GPU core counts that will still outspeed the M2's performance improvements.

Like its predecessor, the M2 has eight CPU cores—four high-performance cores and four low-power efficiency cores. Apple says it will perform about 18 percent faster than the M1's CPU  It also bumps the GPU cores from eight to 10, providing a 35 percent performance boost, though as with M1 we may see multiple versions of the M2 chip that ship with different numbers of GPU cores.

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    Vers un partage de la « Suisse des semi-conducteurs » pour assurer la paix du secteur ?

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Wednesday, 1 June - 06:01

ARM puce

Et si l'entreprise ARM, surnommée la Suisse des semi-conducteurs, était partagée entre les grands fabricants de puces ? C'est la piste soutenue par Qualcomm, qui juge que cela permettrait de garantir sa neutralité et protéger son savoir-faire, afin que tout le monde puisse en profiter. [Lire la suite]

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    Qualcomm wants to buy a stake in Arm alongside its rivals

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 31 May - 14:45

Extreme close-up promotional image of computer component.

Enlarge (credit: Arm )

The US chipmaker Qualcomm wants to buy a stake in Arm alongside its rivals and create a consortium that would maintain the UK chip designer’s neutrality in the highly competitive semiconductor market.

Japanese conglomerate SoftBank plans to list Arm on the New York Stock Exchange after Nvidia’s $66 billion purchase collapsed earlier this year. However, the IPO has sparked concern over the future ownership of the company, given its crucial role in the global technology sector.

“We’re an interested party in investing,” Cristiano Amon, Qualcomm’s chief executive, told the Financial Times. “It’s a very important asset and it’s an asset which is going to be essential to the development of our industry.”

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    La Russie se retrouve tenue à l’écart des processeurs les plus avancés

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Monday, 9 May - 15:59

ARM processeur puce

L'industrie russe, déjà très distancée par le reste du monde en matière de fabrication de processeurs, se retrouve dans une posture encore plus difficile : elle n'a plus la possibilité d'accéder à l'architecture ARM. [Lire la suite]

Abonnez-vous aux newsletters Numerama pour recevoir l’essentiel de l’actualité https://www.numerama.com/newsletter/

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    Qualcomm’s M1-class laptop chips will be ready for PCs in “late 2023”

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Thursday, 28 April - 18:12 · 1 minute

A company logo is superimposed over a cloud-swollen mountaintop.

Enlarge / A splash image for Nuvia from the company's blog. (credit: Nuvia )

Qualcomm bought a chipmaking startup called Nuvia in March 2021, and later that year, the company said it would be using Nuvia's talent and technology to create high-performance custom-designed ARM chips to compete with Apple's processor designs. But if you're waiting for a truly high-performance Windows PC with anything other than an Intel or AMD chip in it, you'll still be waiting for a bit. Qualcomm CEO Christian Amon mentioned during the company's most recent earnings call that its high-performance chips were on track to land in consumer devices "in late 2023."

Qualcomm still plans to sample chips to its partners later in 2022, a time frame it has mentioned previously and has managed to stick to. A gap between sampling and mass production is typical, giving Qualcomm time to work out bugs and improve chip yields and PC manufacturers more time to design and build finished products that incorporate the chips.

Qualcomm acquired Nuvia based in part on its personnel—the company was founded by former members of Apple's chip design team—and in part on its work designing ARM-based server chips. Chip designs take years to bring to market, so even if Nuvia had already been working on chips destined for consumer laptops when it was acquired, it was always going to be at least a couple of years before we could actually buy them in anything.

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