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    SGX, Intel’s supposedly impregnable data fortress, has been breached yet again

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 9 August - 17:01

Architectural bug in some Intel CPUs is more bad news for SGX users

Enlarge (credit: Intel)

Intel’s latest generation of CPUs contains a vulnerability that allows attackers to obtain encryption keys and other confidential information protected by the company’s software guard extensions, the advanced feature that acts as a digital vault for security users’ most sensitive secrets.

Abbreviated as SGX, the protection is designed to provide a fortress of sorts for the safekeeping of encryption keys and other sensitive data, even when the operating system or a virtual machine running on top is maliciously compromised. SGX works by creating trusted execution environments that protect sensitive code and the data it works with from monitoring or tampering by anything else on the system.

Cracks in Intel’s foundational security

SGX is a cornerstone of the security assurances many companies provide to users. Servers used to handle contact discovery for the Signal Messenger, for instance, rely on SGX to ensure the process is anonymous. Signal says running its advanced hashing scheme provides a “general recipe for doing private contact discovery in SGX without leaking any information to parties that have control over the machine, even if they were to attach physical hardware to the memory bus.”

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    Researchers exploit new Intel and AMD CPU flaw to steal encryption keys

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 14 June - 17:00

Researchers exploit new Intel and AMD CPU flaw to steal encryption keys

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Microprocessors from Intel, AMD, and other companies contain a newly discovered weakness that remote attackers can exploit to obtain cryptographic keys and other secret data traveling through the hardware, researchers said on Tuesday.

Hardware manufacturers have long known that hackers can extract secret cryptographic data from a chip by measuring the power it consumes while processing those values. Fortunately, the means for exploiting power-analysis attacks against microprocessors is limited because the threat actor has few viable ways to remotely measure power consumption while processing the secret material. Now, a team of researchers has figured out how to turn power-analysis attacks into a different class of side-channel exploit that's considerably less demanding.

Targeting DVFS

The team discovered that dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS)—a power and thermal management feature added to every modern CPU—allows attackers to deduce the changes in power consumption by monitoring the time it takes for a server to respond to specific carefully made queries. The discovery greatly reduces what's required. With an understanding of how the DVFS feature works, power side-channel attacks become much simpler timing attacks that can be done remotely.

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    Apple announces its next-gen M2 chip, promising 18% faster performance than M1

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Monday, 6 June - 18:00

Apple announces its next-gen M2 chip, promising 18% faster performance than M1

Enlarge (credit: Apple)

CUPERTINO, Calif.—Exactly two years after Apple first announced the M1, its direct successor has finally been revealed. Apple executives and product managers presented details about the new chip—predictably dubbed the M2—during its annual developer conference.

The M2 is an improvement in many ways on the M1, but it's not meant to one-up the higher-end M1 Pro, M1 Max, or M1 Ultra seen in the MacBook Pro and Mac Studio. M2 Pro, Max, and Ultra variants have higher CPU and GPU core counts that will still outspeed the M2's performance improvements.

Like its predecessor, the M2 has eight CPU cores—four high-performance cores and four low-power efficiency cores. Apple says it will perform about 18 percent faster than the M1's CPU  It also bumps the GPU cores from eight to 10, providing a 35 percent performance boost, though as with M1 we may see multiple versions of the M2 chip that ship with different numbers of GPU cores.

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    Guerre en Ukraine : la Russie privée de nouvelles technologies par Taïwan

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Friday, 3 June - 14:30

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En réaction à l'invasion russe en Ukraine, le gouvernement de Taïwan vient de prendre une série de sanctions contre le pays de Vladimir Poutine et le Belarus.

Guerre en Ukraine : la Russie privée de nouvelles technologies par Taïwan

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    AMD : les premiers Ryzen 7000 Zen 4 en 5nm débarquent cet automne !

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Tuesday, 24 May - 10:00

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Au menu : une nouvelle plateforme Zen4, un nouveau socket AM5, et des monstres de puces capables de débiter largement plus de 5 GHz par cœur. Intel est prévenu !

AMD : les premiers Ryzen 7000 Zen 4 en 5nm débarquent cet automne !

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    TSMC est dans les temps, la gravure en 3nm débarque cette année

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Tuesday, 19 April - 16:30

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Les premières puces gravées en 3nm devraient arriver cette année chez TSMC; une date qui marquera le début d'une guerre sans merci entre titans du hardware.

TSMC est dans les temps, la gravure en 3nm débarque cette année

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    Intel : le Core i9-12900KS débarque avec 5,5 GHz au compteur !

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Tuesday, 29 March - 14:30

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Intel avait déjà frappé un grand coup avec son Core i9-12900K, mais le nouveau modèle KS va bientôt placer la barre encore plus haut.

Intel : le Core i9-12900KS débarque avec 5,5 GHz au compteur !

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    Apple : un ingénieur de premier plan quitte le navire et passe chez Intel

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Friday, 7 January, 2022 - 16:00

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Jeff Wilson, grand artisan des phénoménales puces M1, mettra désormais son expertise à la disposition d'Intel.

Apple : un ingénieur de premier plan quitte le navire et passe chez Intel