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    DSA et DMA : l’Europe a maintenant de quoi soumettre les géants du net

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Tuesday, 5 July - 13:31

Thierry Breton

Les parlementaires européens ont validé deux textes concernant la régulation du numérique. Le DSA et le DMA fixent des règles plus dures pour les géants du net, afin de limiter leur influence dans le numérique. Ils sont aussi contraints d'assumer des obligations nouvelles. [Lire la suite]

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    Twitter sera bien modéré, Elon Musk le promet à la Commission européenne

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Tuesday, 10 May - 08:37

Dans une vidéo publiée par Thierry Breton sur Twitter, on découvre que le commissaire européen au commerce intérieur est allé à la rencontre d'Elon Musk. Le milliardaire promet de respecter le futur règlement européen. [Lire la suite]

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    L’interopérabilité des messageries (WhatsApp, Messenger, iMessage) se fera petit à petit

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Thursday, 28 April - 05:01

interopérabilité

L'Union européenne souhaite que les poids lourds de la messagerie s'ouvrent aux petites plateformes. Un calendrier de l'interopérabilité se dessine. [Lire la suite]

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    Le Twitter à la sauce d’Elon Musk ne pourra pas s’exonérer de respecter la loi

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Tuesday, 26 April - 09:08

Elon Musk

La prise de contrôle de Twitter par Elon Musk suscite des inquiétudes. Toutefois, le propriétaire du réseau social devra tenir compte d'une réalité : les pays ont des règles différentes sur la liberté d'expression. Les enfreindre, c'est s'exposer à de lourdes amendes, voire à des actions plus radicales encore. Y compris en France et en Europe. [Lire la suite]

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    EU Reaches Agreement on Digital Services Act, Including New Takedown Rules

    news.movim.eu / TorrentFreak · Monday, 25 April - 08:14 · 3 minutes

eu flag In recent years the European Commission has proposed and adopted various legislative changes to help combat online piracy.

This includes the Copyright Directive which passed in 2019 as well as the Digital Services Act (DSA), which was officially unveiled at the end of 2020 .

The new legislation was met with fierce criticism. Some believe that it will lead to more ‘dumb’ upload filters. At the same time, copyright holders believed that it didn’t go far enough, as there’s no ‘staydown’ requirement.

DSA Agreement

After the official adoption by the EU Parliament earlier this year, representatives of the Parliament, the Council and the Commission engaged in trialogue negotiations to flesh out the final details. On Saturday morning, after 16 hours of discussions, the parties reached an agreement.

At the time of writing the final text is yet to be published. It is clear, however, that the main goal is to keep large online platforms and services accountable to stop the spread of harmful, misleading, and illegal content.

“The DSA will upgrade the ground-rules for all online services in the EU. It will ensure that the online environment remains a safe space, safeguarding freedom of expression and opportunities for digital businesses,” European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen says .

The DSA is the official successor to the E-Commerce Directive. The new package aims to bring EU legislation into line with the current state of the digital age, which has changed dramatically over the past several years.

Takedown Transparency

The legislation includes new rules for big tech and also touches on some copyright issues. These set out how online services should handle takedown notices, without being held liable for user uploads.

In addition, it will allow “trusted flaggers” to get preferential treatment in the takedown process.

The DSA proposal also strengthens the rights of users with a strong focus on transparency. For example, if platforms or services work with trusted flaggers, the public has the right to know who these are.

Also, if a hosting provider removes content following a takedown notice, users should be informed on what grounds this action was taken, and how they can appeal. On top of that, platforms have to take measures to prevent abusive takedown notices.

According to the DSA drafters, this added transparency is required to safeguard the fundamental right to freedom of expression.

Big Tech

The new rules and requirements don’t apply equally to all online platforms and services. The DSA makes a distinction between intermediary services, hosting services, online platforms, and very large platforms. The strictest rules apply to the latter category, which includes “big tech” outfits with more than 45 million EU users.

For example, the DSA requires online platforms and big tech to properly verify the identities of third-party suppliers to tackle the sale and distribution of illegal content. This KYBC requirement does not apply to intermediaries and hosting platforms.

The big tech companies also have to allow for external audits and offer broad transparency into how their recommendation algorithms work. If a company doesn’t comply with any of these rules, the EU can issue multi-million euro fines.

It is hard to properly evaluate the final agreement without the final text. However, over the past months, we have seen that both rightsholders and digital rights activists are not completely happy with the DSA, which is an indication that it’s somewhat of a compromise.

The new DSA rules will go into effect for big tech platforms later this year. For the other platforms and services, it can take up to 2024 before the changes go into effect.

From: TF , for the latest news on copyright battles, piracy and more.

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    DSA : l’Europe s’accorde pour mettre au pas les géants du net

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Saturday, 23 April - 09:47

Thierry Breton

Du retrait des contenus haineux aux algorithmes plus transparents, en passant par la lutte contre la contrefaçon, les plateformes du net vont faire face à de nouvelles obligations avec le DSA (Digital Services Act). Et des sanctions importantes si elles ne les suivent pas. [Lire la suite]

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    Les pubs ciblées en fonction de l’orientation sexuelle ou de la religion vont être interdites en Europe

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Monday, 24 January, 2022 - 10:37

Après des mois de débats, le Parlement européen a adopté le 20 janvier le « Digital Services Act », sa grande loi visant à réguler les plateformes du numérique. Elle pourrait entrer en vigueur début 2023. [Lire la suite]

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    EU’s Digital Services Act Proposes New Content Removal Rights and Rules

    news.movim.eu / TorrentFreak · Tuesday, 15 December, 2020 - 18:34 · 4 minutes

eu flag For roughly two decades, major EU copyright rulings have been founded in the E-Commerce Directive.

This legislation defines how online services and platforms should handle potentially infringing content if they don’t want to be held liable.

Today, the EU proposed the Digital Services Act (DSA), which is the official successor to the E-Commerce Directive. The new package aims to bring EU legislation into line with the current state of the digital age, which has changed dramatically over the past several years.

The official text (pdf) has just been released and needs to be properly analyzed but there are some early broad conclusions that we can draw. Since we mostly cover copyright issues, we will focus on that angle specifically, but the full proposal has a much greater scope.

The DSA will have far-reaching consequences and applies to all platforms and services that can be accessed in the EU. The rules and regulations for each company differ based on their size and what type of service they provide.

There is a strong focus on notice and takedowns and the European Commission summarizes the impact of the new obligations as follows:

“The Digital Services Act significantly improves the mechanisms for the removal of illegal content and for the effective protection of users’ fundamental rights online, including the freedom of speech.

“It also creates a stronger public oversight of online platforms, in particular for platforms that reach more than 10% of the EU’s population,” the Commission adds.

The removal of illegal content includes, but is not limited to, material that infringes copyright law. While there have been some discussions about including “harmful” content as well, these proposals were rejected. So what is the definition of illegal content?

What is Illegal Content?

The DSA proposal has a rather broad definition of illegal that may cause controversy. It specifically includes “information relating to illegal content”, as the proposal explains.

“In particular, that concept should be understood to refer to information, irrespective of its form, that under the applicable law is either itself illegal […] or that relates to activities that are illegal, such as […] the non-authorized use of copyright protected material…”

While we don’t expect writing about copyright infringement to be outlawed, people who create specific in-depth tutorials on how to commit copyright infringement (such as how to pirate movies or music, for example) will likely be impacted.

No Monitoring Obligation

There are also positive notes in the proposal in respect of Internet freedom. For example, the DSA clearly states that there are no monitoring obligations for online services and platforms. In fact, such obligations remain prohibited, as they were in the E-Commerce Directive.

“The new Regulation prohibits general monitoring obligations, as they could disproportionately limit users’ freedom of expression and freedom to receive information and could burden service providers excessively,” the proposal reads.

Tackling Abuse Both Sides

Regular takedown requests remain an option, as expected. There are no ‘staydown’ requirements, as some rightsholders previously requested. However, online platforms must respond to abuse. This applies to both senders and recipients.

The DSA notes that there is a need to act against repeat offenders who continue to submit illegal content. However, the same applies to persons or rightsholders who continue to send unfounded takedown requests.

“[T]here is a need to put in place appropriate and proportionate safeguards against such misuse,” the proposal reads, noting that it harms the rights of the parties involved. For this reason, and under the right conditions, these abusers should be suspended.

“Under certain conditions, online platforms should temporarily suspend their relevant activities in respect of the person engaged in abusive behavior.”

Takedown Transparency

The DSA proposal also has a strong focus on transparency. For example, if platforms or services work with “trusted flaggers” who have extra rights to remove content, the public has the right to know who these are.

Also, if a hosting provider removes content following a takedown notice, users should be informed on what grounds this action was taken, and how he or she can appeal.

The DSA clarifies that this transparency is required in light of “the negative consequences that such decisions may have for the recipient, including as regards the exercise of its fundamental right to freedom of expression.”

Going Forward

The issues we highlighted here are just a small selection of the broader proposal, which is available in full here . This also includes obligations for the largest platforms to allow audits of their algorithms and policies.

During the coming weeks and months, all proposals will be carefully analyzed by various experts and stakeholders. The same is true for the proposal Digital Markets Act, which was also released today.

Needless to say, the DSA proposal will ignite yet another battle between various stakeholders. Copyright holders, for example, are likely to ask for stricter measures and obligations, while digital rights groups and online services will argue in favor of the opposite.

From: TF , for the latest news on copyright battles, piracy and more.