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    The new “Intel Processor” will replace Pentium and Celeron CPU branding in 2023

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 16 September - 15:25 · 1 minute

The new “Intel Processor” will replace Pentium and Celeron CPU branding in 2023

Enlarge (credit: Intel)

Intel's processor lineup used to be, in the words of one of our greatest working artists , all about the Pentiums. That became less true beginning in the mid-2000s , when the modern "Core" branding was created to emphasize the company's then-new multi-core processor offerings. But it was still sometimes about the Pentiums—Pentium and Celeron have both soldiered on into the modern era as brand names for low-end desktop and laptop CPUs.

But the labels may not be long for this world, even in that diminished capacity. Intel announced today that its laptop chips will shed the Pentium and Celeron branding beginning in Q1 of 2023, to be replaced by "Intel Processor." The word "Processor" has a capital P so that you don't confuse an Intel Processor with an Intel processor.

Intel VP Josh Newman claims that unifying the Pentium and Celeron families together under one nondescript umbrella "will simplify [Intel's] offerings so users can focus on choosing the right processor for their needs." But this rebranding doesn't necessarily mean that the lineup is being simplified; Pentium and Celeron laptop chips are spread out across two distinct product families with two entirely different architectures, one based on low-power Atom cores and another based on the same Alder Lake architecture as Intel's flagship CPUs. Assuming that Intel Processors still come with model numbers, they will become even more important for people who want to know exactly which Intel processor they're buying.

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    Raptor Lake : Intel laisse fuiter des détails sur sa 13e génération de CPU

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Wednesday, 14 September - 08:00

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Au menu : quelques bribes d'informations sur trois modèles de la prochaine gamme de processeurs Intel.

Raptor Lake : Intel laisse fuiter des détails sur sa 13e génération de CPU

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    Raptor Lake : Intel annonce des chiffres hallucinants pour ses futurs CPU

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Tuesday, 13 September - 14:30

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Intel parle d'un CPU capable d'atteindre les 8 GHz une fois overclocké.

Raptor Lake : Intel annonce des chiffres hallucinants pour ses futurs CPU

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    Thunderbolt hits 80Gbps in demo, equaling USB4 Version 2.0 speeds

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 13 September - 14:27

Closeup of USB Type C connector and black cable being connected into Thunderbolt port

Enlarge (credit: Getty )

Intel is working on making its Thunderbolt technology support a throughput of 80Gbps. That would put it on par with the upcoming USB4 Version 2.0 specification and double the throughput of today's Thunderbolt 4.

Intel showed a video of the "first test system" using a Thunderbolt connection running at 80Gbps today, Tom's Hardware reported from the Intel Development Center in Haifa, Israel. The demo was not live, and the company didn't provide a name or release date for the next generation of Thunderbolt, so we expect it to be a while before consumers start seeing this kind of performance in products.

The Thunderbolt connection reportedly hit 80Gbps by use of two Thunderbolt lanes, with each one running at 40Gbps. With USB-C becoming increasingly popular among gadgets and some countries considering , pushing for , or issuing USB-C mandates for electronics, it's not surprising to hear that the demo ran over the slim connector.

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    The clock speed wars are back as Intel brags about hitting 6 GHz with 13th-gen CPUs

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Monday, 12 September - 20:01 · 1 minute

The clock speed wars are back as Intel brags about hitting 6 GHz with 13th-gen CPUs

Enlarge (credit: Intel)

Intel is gearing up to release the first products in its 13th-generation Core processor family, codenamed Raptor Lake. Among the topline facts that the company announced at its Intel Technology Tour is that at least one member of the Raptor Lake family will be capable of hitting 6 GHz out of the box ( via Tom's Hardware ). Core counts and architectural improvements are generally more important than clock speed when it comes to increasing a CPU's performance these days, but after many years hanging out in the 5 GHz range, it's neat to hit the next digit.

As for what this means for performance, Intel is saying that Raptor Lake will perform roughly 15 percent better in single-threaded tasks and 41 percent better in multi-threaded workloads than the current 12th-generation Alder Lake chips. Clock speed is more important for boosting single-threaded performance, while adding more cores is usually the best way to improve multi-threaded speeds.

It's not clear which of the CPUs will be capable of hitting 6 GHz or under what circumstances or for how long. An Intel SKU chart published by Igor's Lab suggests that the Core i9-13900K will top out at 5.8 GHz, though it's possible that it's capable of further boosting beyond that.

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    Leaked “shopping list” reveals Russia’s most “desperately” needed war tech

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 6 September - 20:12

Leaked “shopping list” reveals Russia’s most “desperately” needed war tech

Enlarge (credit: NurPhoto / Contributor | NurPhoto )

Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal this week told Politico that he expects that diminished access to technology will be the driving force staving off Russia's ongoing attacks. Since invading Ukraine, Russia has spent months burning through nearly half of the critical military technology in its arsenal, and now Politico has shared a leaked "shopping list" of tech that Russia is most urgently seeking to replenish its stockpile.

"According to our information, Russians have already spent almost half... of their weaponry arsenal," Shmyhal told Politico.

Among about two dozen "chokepoint technologies" that Russia "most desperately" needs to stay in the fight are microchips manufactured by eight US tech companies that America hopes to block Russia from accessing through sanctions.

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    Breaking down how USB4 goes where no USB standard has gone before

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 2 September - 10:40 · 1 minute

Breaking down how USB4 goes where no USB standard has gone before

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Aurich Lawson)

USB has come a long way since the 12Mbps days of the '90s. It has waved goodbye to USB-B and is inching away from USB-A in favor of the slim, reversible USB-C connector. Data transfer rates have increased so dramatically that we can run powerful setups with high-resolution monitors, speedy external storage, and numerous other devices from the USB Implementers Forum's latest open standard, USB4.

USB4 unifies the USB and Intel Thunderbolt protocols for the first time, expanding USB's capabilities while further dividing the technology into different performance classes. Adding features like dynamic bandwidth allocation ensures that USB4 is by far the most advanced USB generation. While there are PCs, docks, and cables supporting USB4, we've yet to see everything the protocol can do, like powering an eGPU without Intel branding.

With all that going on, we thought it would be a great time to put a spotlight on the latest and greatest generation of USB. We've whipped up a handy refresher for all things USB4, breaking down the various key aspects of the spec, from how it differs from other specs to protocol tunneling, Alt Mode, and power delivery.

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    Intel leans on more E-cores for performance boosts in leaked 13th-gen CPU lineup

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Monday, 22 August - 17:24 · 1 minute

A Core i7-12700. A leaked list of Intel's 13th-generation Core desktop CPUs claims that most of them will be getting more E-cores than their 12th-generation counterparts.

Enlarge / A Core i7-12700. A leaked list of Intel's 13th-generation Core desktop CPUs claims that most of them will be getting more E-cores than their 12th-generation counterparts. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

Our understanding of Intel's 13th-generation Core CPUs, codenamed "Raptor Lake," continues to take shape ahead of their planned launch this fall. Motherboards for current-gen Alder Lake chips have been adding preliminary support for them , and now a supposed list of the desktop CPU lineup ( as reported by Tom's Hardware ) suggests that Intel will be leaning on its CPUs' small efficiency cores (E-cores) for much of their performance gains.

Based on Intel's disclosures, we know that Raptor Lake CPUs will use the same CPU and GPU architectures and Intel 7 manufacturing process as Alder Lake. Its large performance cores (P-cores) will be based on an architecture called "Raptor Cove," though technical documents don't distinguish between it and Alder Lake's "Golden Cove" cores. And the E-cores will be based on the same Atom-derived Gracemont architecture that Alder Lake uses. The big cores handle the heavy lifting and provide the best performance for games and other apps that benefit from good single-core performance, while the E-cores pitch in for lower-priority and background tasks plus workloads like CPU-based video encoding and rendering jobs that can engage all of your processor's cores at once. It's tough to make exact performance comparisons, but AnandTech's benchmarks of E-cores in isolation suggest that they are about as fast as a midrange 6th-gen Skylake CPU core most of the time.

Intel has also confirmed that some Raptor Lake chips will include up to 24 physical cores, spread out across eight P-cores and 16 E-cores. Alder Lake CPUs max out at eight E-cores, for a total of 16 physical cores.

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