close
  • chevron_right

    Diving deep into Briar (and Monal)

    debacle · pubsub.movim.eu / berlin-xmpp-meetup · Friday, 8 October - 18:05 edit

Diving deep into Briar (and Monal)

We are very happy to have Nico Alt from The Briar Project with us, who will give a talk Diving deep into Briar: a closer look at its internals If everything works well, the talk will be streamed over media.ccc.de. Briar is a secure messaging technology based on peer-to-peer communications with no centralized servers.

Also we will welcome a special guest, Thilo Molitor‎ from Monal, who will explain how Monal works and can answer questions. Monal is a "fast, friendly and free" Jabber/XMPP client for iOS and MacOS.

When? Wednesday, 2021-10-13 18:00 CEST (always 2ⁿᵈ Wednesday of every month)

Where?xHain hack+makespace, Grünberger Str. 16, 10243 Berlin (as formerly)

See you then!

If you watch the live stream, you may ask questions in our non-physical room (xmpp:berlin-meetup@conference.conversations.im?join). Streaming URL and other information will also be passed there.

#jabber #xmpp #community #xhain #freesoftware #berlin #meetup #federation #briar #securemessaging #monal #ios #macos

UPDATED COVID-19 RULES: To enter xHain, you must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 or recovered ("2G"), with certificate. See Hygiene concept xHain.

  • favorite

    1 Like

    Holger Weiß

  • chevron_right

    iPadOS 15 mini-review: Playing catch-up with the iPhone

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Thursday, 7 October - 22:33

Widgets on iPadOS 15

Enlarge / Widgets on iPadOS 15's home screen. (credit: Samuel Axon)

Last year, Apple released a meaty iOS update for iPhones, but some of the biggest changes didn't make it over to the iPad. This year, the iPhone update is modest—so does that mean that the iPad update is the big one this time around?

Well, that depends on your point of view. iPadOS 15 brings almost everything iOS 15 brought to iPhones, but it also brings those major iOS 14 omissions from last year to the tablet. As a result, iPadOS 15 feels like a significant update if you haven't been using an iPhone lately, but if you've already used iOS 14's new home screen and app library features, it instead ends up feeling like it's late to the party.

We published a lengthy, iPhone-focused review of iOS 15 earlier this week. Consider this a short addendum to that review that puts the spotlight on the iPad. Refer to the earlier review for details on new features like Focus that aren't iPad specific or for a list of iPads that are supported by iPadOS 15.

Read 38 remaining paragraphs | Comments

index?i=yGjCX9QheHM:gcRG7OP_Ziw:V_sGLiPBpWUindex?i=yGjCX9QheHM:gcRG7OP_Ziw:F7zBnMyn0Loindex?d=qj6IDK7rITsindex?d=yIl2AUoC8zA
  • chevron_right

    iOS 15 review: Forget quantity, Focus on quality

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 5 October - 14:01

Screenshot of smartphone interface.

Enlarge / A few apps that received significant updates in iOS 15. (credit: Samuel Axon)

Every year, Apple releases a major update to its operating systems for the iPhone and iPad that sets the stage for a year of changes to come.  This year, iOS 15 brings new FaceTime and Messages features, tweaks to existing apps and notifications, and most notably, a new way of managing apps and notifications called Focus.

Frankly, this is a relatively modest update compared to what we saw last year. That's amplified by the fact that some key features that Apple initially announced in June haven't made it into the initial release of iOS 15. But today we'll be exploring whether a modest update means a bad one. Should you bother to upgrade to the new version of iOS when it's mostly a tune-up and a fresh coat of paint?

As always, let's start with a look at which devices are still supported.

Read 102 remaining paragraphs | Comments

index?i=pKpibU__Jf4:AvS9MBnoafE:V_sGLiPBpWUindex?i=pKpibU__Jf4:AvS9MBnoafE:F7zBnMyn0Loindex?d=qj6IDK7rITsindex?d=yIl2AUoC8zA
  • chevron_right

    Apple turns post-lawsuit tables on Epic, will block Fortnite on iOS

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Friday, 24 September - 01:55

Extreme close-up photograph of a hand holding a smartphone.

Enlarge / A Fortnite loading screen displayed on an iPhone in 2018, when Apple and Epic weren't at each other's legal throats. (credit: Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images )

Weeks after Epic's apparent "win" against Apple in the Epic Games v. Apple case, Apple issued a letter denying Epic's request to have its developer license agreement reinstated until all legal options are exhausted. This effectively bans Fortnite and any other software from the game maker from returning to Apple's App Store for years.

Epic was handed an initial victory when the US District Court for Northern California issued an injunction on September 10 ordering Apple to open up in-game payment options for all developers. At the time, the injunction was something of a moral victory for Epic—allowing the developer to keep its in-game payment systems in its free-to-play Fortnite intact while avoiding paying Apple a 30 percent fee that had previously covered all in-app transactions.

But now Epic has faced a significant reversal of fortune.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

index?i=VX86MmEisxk:O_sQ630UtsM:V_sGLiPBpWUindex?i=VX86MmEisxk:O_sQ630UtsM:F7zBnMyn0Loindex?d=qj6IDK7rITsindex?d=yIl2AUoC8zA