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    Elon Musk montre à quoi ressemble « l’attrapeur de fusées » de SpaceX

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Monday, 10 January - 09:36

SpaceX

SpaceX veut se débarrasser du train d'atterrissage de ses fusées. Pour cela, l'entreprise imagine un mécanisme pour attraper les lanceurs au vol, juste avant qu'ils ne se posent. [Lire la suite]

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    Suivez en direct le premier décollage de SpaceX de 2022

    news.movim.eu / Numerama · Thursday, 6 January - 10:26

SpaceX Falcon 9 Starlink

Starlink fait décoller une fusée Falcon 9 pour déployer 49 satellites Starlink. Le vol est prévu le 6 janvier et peut être suivi en direct. [Lire la suite]

Voitures, vélos, scooters... : la mobilité de demain se lit sur Vroom ! https://www.numerama.com/vroom/

  • Jo chevron_right

    Les satellites Starlink sont-ils les chauffards de l’espace ?

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Sunday, 2 January - 14:00

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Le coup de gueule de la Chine, qui a annoncé que sa station spatiale avait dû procéder à des manœuvres d'évitement de satellites Starlink, pourrait accélérer la mise en œuvre de régulations pour mieux gérer le trafic spatial autour de la Terre.

Les satellites Starlink sont-ils les chauffards de l’espace ?

  • Ar chevron_right

    Elon Musk rejects claims his satellites are squeezing out rivals in space

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Wednesday, 29 December - 21:49

Falcon 9 rocket on the launch pad.

Enlarge / A SpaceX rocket ready for launch. (credit: Trevor Mahlmann)

Elon Musk has hit back at criticism that his company’s Starlink satellites are hogging too much room in space, and has instead argued there could be room for “tens of billions” of spacecraft in orbits close to Earth.

“Space is just extremely enormous, and satellites are very tiny,” Musk said. “This is not some situation where we’re effectively blocking others in any way. We’ve not blocked anyone from doing anything, nor do we expect to.”

His comments, made in an interview with the Financial Times, came in response to a claim from Josef Aschbacher, head of the European Space Agency, that Musk was “making the rules” for the new commercial space economy. Speaking to the FT earlier this month, Aschbacher warned that Musk’s rush to launch thousands of communications satellites would leave fewer radio frequencies and orbital slots available for everyone else.

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  • Ar chevron_right

    China upset about needing to dodge SpaceX Starlink satellites

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Tuesday, 28 December - 18:26

Image of a rocket launch.

Enlarge / A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from pad 40 at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in May 2021 carrying the 29th batch of approximately 60 satellites as part of SpaceX's Starlink broadband Internet network. (credit: SOPA Images / Getty Images )

Earlier in December, the Chinese government filed a document with the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space at the United Nations. The body helps manage the terms of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, more commonly known as the Outer Space Treaty. In the document, China alleges that it had to move its space station twice this year due to potential collisions with Starlink satellites operated by SpaceX.

The document pointedly notes that signatories of the treaty, which include the US, are responsible for the actions of any nongovernmental activities based within their borders.

The document was filed back on December 6, but it only came to light recently when Chinese Internet users became aware of it and started flaming Elon Musk , head of SpaceX.

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  • Ar chevron_right

    This may finally be the year we see some new chunky rockets take flight

    news.movim.eu / ArsTechnica · Monday, 27 December - 13:15

The Falcon Heavy rocket is the most recent heavy-lift booster to debut, and that was more than three years ago.

Enlarge / The Falcon Heavy rocket is the most recent heavy-lift booster to debut, and that was more than three years ago. (credit: Trevor Mahlmann / Ars Technica )

A little more than three years ago, Ars published an article assessing the potential for four large rockets to make their debut in 2020. Spoiler alert: none of them made it. None even made it in 2021. So will next year finally be the year for some of them?

Probably. Maybe. We sure hope so.

At the time of the older article's publication, July 2018, four heavy-lift rockets still had scheduled launch dates for 2020—the European Space Agency's Ariane 6, NASA's Space Launch System, Blue Origin's New Glenn, and United Launch Alliance's Vulcan rocket. The article estimated the actual launch dates, predicting that Europe's Ariane 6 would be the only rocket to make a launch attempt in 2020. All four of the predicted launch dates proved overly optimistic, alas.

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  • Jo chevron_right

    SpaceX banalise l’extraordinaire avec une 100e réception de boosters

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Wednesday, 22 December - 15:30

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SpaceX, entreprise encore inconnue il y a 6 ans vient de réaliser la 100e récupération de premier étage de son histoire.

SpaceX banalise l’extraordinaire avec une 100e réception de boosters

  • Jo chevron_right

    Elon Musk veut capturer le CO2 atmosphérique pour faire voler ses fusées

    news.movim.eu / JournalDuGeek · Tuesday, 21 December - 07:00

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Le projet de capture de carbone d'ELon Musk semble progresser, et il envisage désormais d'en faire du carburant pour les fusées de SpaceX.

Elon Musk veut capturer le CO2 atmosphérique pour faire voler ses fusées