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      What makes Elon Musk tick? I spent months following the same people as him to find out who fuels his curious worldview

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 7 days ago - 06:00 · 1 minute

    Tucker Carlson, Greta Thunberg, Covid sceptics, military historians, the royal family … What would my time immersed in the Twitter/X owner’s feed reveal about the richest man in the world?

    What’s it like to be Elon Musk? On almost every level it is impossible to imagine – he’s just too much. Musk is the hands-on head of three mega-companies, one (Tesla) wildly successful, one (SpaceX) madly aspirational, one (Twitter/X) a shambles. He has plenty of other businesses on the side, including The Boring Company (which makes hi-tech tunnels), Neuralink (which makes brain-computer interfaces), and his current pet favourite xAI (mission: “To understand the true nature of the universe”). He is the on-again, off-again richest human being on the planet, his personal net worth sometimes fluctuating by more than $10bn a day as the highly volatile Tesla share price lurches up and down. He is the father of 11 children – one of whom died as an infant, and from one of whom he is currently estranged – with three different women, which to his own mind at least seems to make him some kind of family man. He has 155 million followers on Twitter/X (we’ll call it Twitter from now on for simplicity’s sake), which is more than anyone else. Only a very few people – Barack Obama (132 million), Justin Bieber (111 million) – can have any idea of what that is like.

    However, unlike Obama, who follows 550,000 accounts on Twitter, Musk follows only 415. That anyone can copy (or at least they could, before the platform recently changed its code so you can now only see a small handful of users’ followers rather than the full list). So that’s what I did, spending this past summer following the exact same accounts Musk follows and no one else, to see what the world looks like from inside his personal Twitter bubble. I wanted to be a fly on the wall in the room with the people who are shaping the thoughts of one of the most influential, and unpredictable, individuals on the planet. I should add that I’ve never followed anyone else on Twitter before – I’ve never even had a Twitter account – so it was all new to me. What can I say? It’s pretty mind-blowing.

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      Mental health among UK secondary pupils worsened sharply in pandemic, study shows

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Thursday, 21 September - 15:00

    First comparative research of its kind finds those with lots of social interaction and supportive family coped better

    Secondary school pupils in the UK experienced significantly higher rates of depression, social, emotional and behavioural difficulties, and overall worse mental wellbeing during the Covid pandemic, research shows.

    Cases of depression among secondary school pupils aged 11 to 13 rose by 8.5% during the pandemic compared with a 0.3% increase for the same cohort prior to Covid, according to a comparative study by researchers at the University of Oxford’s psychiatry department.

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      Trump and Meadows joked about Covid on plane after Biden debate, book says

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Wednesday, 20 September - 12:52

    Exclusive: Ex-aide Cassidy Hutchinson says Trump ordered White House guests who tested positive to remove masks in Oval Office

    Donald Trump and his chief of staff Mark Meadows joked about the then US president having Covid on Air Force One after the first debate with Joe Biden in 2020 – an event at which Trump was not tested but three days before which, Meadows later confessed, Trump had indeed tested positive.

    On the flight, on 29 September 2020, Trump speculated about his health, saying he thought his voice had sounded “a little bit off” at a rally in Duluth, Minnesota. But he also said he did not want the media to “accuse me of something ridiculous, like having Covid”.

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      Prolonged grief disorder more common in Covid lockdown bereaved, study finds

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Tuesday, 19 September - 17:10

    Social isolation and loneliness in early bereavement found to strongly contribute to worse symptoms

    People bereaved during the first two waves of the Covid pandemic are three times more likely to be suffering from prolonged grief disorder (PGD), which can leave them in intense emotional pain and lonely, research from Cardiff and Bristol universities has revealed.

    The disorder, also known as complicated grief, can result in persistent longing for the deceased, intense emotional pain including guilt and denial, and trouble engaging with friends and planning for the future, all of which goes on for longer than six months.

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      Tell us your experience of accessing Covid antiviral medicines in the UK

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Monday, 18 September - 11:13

    We would like to hear from people who are eligible for antivirals and their experience accessing them

    During the Covid pandemic, a centralised system was developed for prescribing antiviral drugs to high risk patients who test positive for Covid.

    However in June this year the system was changed , with each NHS integrated care board (ICB) in England now having their own arrangements. As a result, people who are eligible for such drugs now need to contact local health services to find out themselves how to get hold of them if they test positive for Covid.

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      Pub closures rise sharply amid warning over planned business rate change

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Monday, 18 September - 06:01

    Nearly 400 pubs closed their doors for good in England and Wales in first half of 2023, almost as many as the whole of 2022

    The number of pubs in England and Wales that shut their doors for good rose sharply in the first half of 2023, prompting warnings to the government that planned rises in business rates could force further closures in the beleaguered sector.

    Figures show that 383 pubs, or more than two a day, “vanished” in the first six months of this year, almost matching the total for the whole of 2022, when 386 were lost.

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      Who lives and who dies in the next pandemic should not depend on where they live | Michael Marmot

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Sunday, 17 September - 09:00

    Aids and Covid had the worst impact in poorer countries and communities; a new health accord must address this

    The Covid pandemic was an equivocator with global unity – to misquote the porter in Macbeth . We were united in being affected by the pandemic but both its effects and the responses to it were grossly unequal. More, inequality worsens pandemics, not only current pandemics such as Aids and Covid but those yet to come.

    Governments are looking to address one side of this equivocation through their negotiations on a pandemic accord that will be discussed during the UN general assembly in New York this month. Such a development is welcome and much needed. It is the other side, inequality, that is missing from the draft pandemic treaty and from governments’ pandemic preparedness plans. If lessons are learned, the next pandemic can be made less tragic in its effects.

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      ‘Lessons have been forgotten’: is the UK ready for a new Covid variant?

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Saturday, 16 September - 16:00 · 1 minute

    With worrying mutations, limited vaccine rollout, vastly reduced testing and a creaking health service, experts are predicting a tough few months ahead

    “New variant”, “care home outbreak”, “cases rising”: you’d be forgiven if the headlines around Pirola, or BA.2.86 , the latest Covid strain to arrive in the UK, had triggered a severe case of pandemic deja vu. More than two years since the UK’s last lockdown, concerns over BA.2.86 – known to have infected dozens of people in the UK as of last weekend, including 28 at a Norfolk care home – have been rising. The worry is over what is “the most striking Sars-CoV-2 strain the world has witnessed since the emergence of Omicron”, according to Francois Balloux , professor of computational systems biology and director of the University College London Genetics Institute.

    That Omicron outbreak resulted in almost half of all Britons getting infected with Covid last year, and we may be facing a repeat performance at what scientists say is the worst possible time. With temperatures falling (colder climes help the virus to thrive), schools and universities returning to large-scale indoor mixing – and at the outset of flu season – the overall rise in infections is already “translating to hospitalisations and deaths, increased NHS pressure, as well as more than a million suffering from long-term health problems under the umbrella term long Covid”, says Stephen Griffin , professor of cancer virology at the University of Leeds and a member of Independent Sage. “The NHS is buckling from continued underfunding and staff shortages.”

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      The new Covid-19 booster shot: what you need to know

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Saturday, 16 September - 14:00

    US authorities have approved a vaccine that protects from one of the most widely circulating strains of coronavirus

    A retooled single-dose Covid “booster” shot is expected to hit pharmacy shelves just as cold and flu season is ramping up. This week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized new shots for emergency use , and a panel of experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended nearly everyone in the US get one.

    But just how soon should people in the US head to their local pharmacies for the new vaccine? And, after so many people have already been vaccinated or sickened by Covid, how urgent is it to get another dose? Below, we fill in details of the agencies’ latest recommendations.

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