• chevron_right

      Three Kilometres to the End of the World review – brutal self-denial in deepest Romania

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 3 days ago - 17:00 · 1 minute

    Cannes film festival
    A drama of despair plays out in a remote village, as a debt-ridden father is mortified to discover his son is gay

    Here is a self-laceratingly painful tale of repression and denial in a remote Romanian village in the Danube delta, directed by Emanuel Parvu. It’s in the gimlet-eyed observational and satirical style of the new Romanian cinema, a kind of movie-making that in extended dialogue scenes seeks out the bland bureaucratic language of the police and church authorities; their evasive mannerisms, their reactionary worldviews and lifelong habits of indicating opinions in quiet voices and in code, things they don’t want to be held responsible for, and for things they want to keep enclosed in silence.

    The drama concerns a careworn guy, Dragoi (Bogdan Dumitrache), who owes money to a local tough guy and is badly behind with the debt. Then he discovers that his 17-year-old son Adi (Ciprian Chiujdea), the apple of his eye – whom he is planning to send to military school next year, and whom he fondly imagines to be dating a local girl – has been badly beaten up by the money-lender’s sons. With icy rage, Dragoi takes this to be the man’s unforgivably violent way of demanding his money.

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      The Cannes red carpet so far: from Naomi Campbell in 90s Chanel to Anya Taylor-Joy in Dior – in pictures

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 3 days ago - 16:06


    From Jane Fonda’s animal print coat paired with silver ballet flats, to Jasmin Jobson’s silver bandeau and Chris Hemsworth’s old Hollywood jacket, there was a lot to enjoy on the Croisette this week

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      Francis Ford Coppola: US politics is at ‘the point where we might lose our republic’

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 3 days ago - 15:36

    Speaking at Cannes, the director says Megalopolis, his reworking of ancient Rome’s Catiline conspiracy, has become ever more prescient

    Megalopolis review – Coppola’s passion project is megabloated and megaboring

    The US, whose founders tried to emulate the laws and governmental structures of the Roman republic, is headed for a similarly self-inflicted collapse, director Francis Ford Coppola has said at the premiere of his first film in more than a decade.

    “What’s happening in America, in our republic, in our democracy, is exactly how Rome lost their republic thousands of years ago,” Coppola told a press conference at the Cannes film festival on Friday. “Our politics has taken us to the point where we might lose our republic.”

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      Will fashion’s flamboyant powerhouse Isabella Blow finally get her dues?

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 3 days ago - 13:12

    Beneath the famous hats was a prime mover in a British golden age, as a biopic is about to show

    The legendary fashion editor Isabella Blow is remembered by her hats. A jewel-encrusted lobster which snaked back from her brow like a crustacean mohican. A miniature Chinese garden, complete with tiny eaved pagodas and lilliputian cherry trees with quivering blossoms. Her trademark was so distinctive that Princess Margaret once greeted her at a party with the words: “Good evening, Hat.” At her funeral in 2007, an 18th-century black galleon headpiece with delicate lace sails cascading from its lofty prow, created for her by her favourite milliner Philip Treacy, crowned her coffin on a bed of white roses.

    But The Queen of Fashion, a newly announced biopic directed by Alex Marx with the Oscar-nominated actor Andrea Riseborough cast in the title role, is set to highlight Blow’s more serious role as a central figure in a golden age of British fashion, a kingmaker who launched the career of Alexander McQueen, and a powerhouse who helped put 1990s London at the centre of the creative world.

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      Christmas Eve in Miller’s Point review – charming hometown family study is extended party

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 3 days ago - 12:16 · 1 minute

    Cannes film festival
    There isn’t much plot in Tyler Taormina’s very charming and rich movie about one huge family’s festivities, but it’s engrossing, exalted even

    At first glance, there’s some reason to be suspicious of this film, with its possible nepo shenanigans. It’s about an extended blue collar family with a tinge of crime … and it features Francesca Scorsese, daughter of Martin. It’s also about the teeming warmth of a suburban American home, whose inhabitants seem on the verge of something epiphanic … and it features Sawyer Spielberg, son of Steven. But for all the influence-anxiety that anything like this carries with it, this is a very charming and rich movie, teeming with ambient detail, from very original and distinctive film-maker Tyler Taormina, whose previous picture Ham on Rye I very much admired.

    Despite or because of the fact that almost nothing really happens in any conventionally dramatic sense, and that what might in another movie be considered background establishing detail here pretty much carries on for an hour and three quarters until the closing credits, Christmas Eve in Miller’s Point is unexpectedly beguiling and engrossing, with an almost experimental refusal of narrative in its normal sense. Like Ham on Rye, it is about hometown values, and the overwhelming but unquantifiable importance of that place where you started your life.

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      From capes to plunging necklines, all the fashion fun of Cannes film festival

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 3 days ago - 11:00


    The best outfits, the looks that might trickle down and styles that should stay on the riviera

    An unofficial fashion week, Cannes film festival has been turning the southern French city into one big photo opportunity this week.

    Always considered the most fashionable of all the film festivals, the connection was confirmed this year: the relatively new film production division of the fashion house Saint Laurent will premiere three titles.

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      Hollywood should look beyond Star Wars and Lord of the Rings retreads for sequels

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 3 days ago - 09:46 · 1 minute

    The blockbuster franchises are showing signs of serious wear and tear, so why don’t the studios take on newer worlds created by the likes of Christopher Nolan and Alex Garland?

    Some of the greatest genre movies of all time are sequels. Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back; Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan; The Godfather Part II; The Dark Knight; Police Academy 7: Mission to Moscow. OK, maybe not that last one, but you get the idea. There is absolutely no reason that lightning can’t strike twice, or even three, four, five, six times, if the will and creative verve are in place.

    And yet there is also a law of diminishing returns. This week Planet of the Apes writer-producer team Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver revealed that they are planning another five films in the dystopian sci-fi series, after the barnstorming box office and critical success of latest instalment Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes. Last week we discovered that Lord of the Rings legend Peter Jackson is overseeing a new movie about Gollum that will retread territory skipped over in the Oscar-winning trilogy from the turn of the century. The Mandalorian and Grogu, which this week announced that sci-fi scream queen Sigourney Weaver is joining its cast in an undisclosed role, will be the 12th full-length live action Star Wars film to hit the big screen. The Marvel Cinematic Universe currently stands 33 movies strong. And these are the big budget, tent-pole franchises, the ones with the bucks to hire the top talent. Can any of us honestly say they are all getting better?

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      ‘Exhausting and extremely dangerous’: Mohammad Rasoulof on his escape from Iran

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 3 days ago - 09:44

    Exclusive: The director of The Seed of the Sacred Fig details how he discarded electronic devices and fled over the mountains on foot after authorities sentenced him to eight years in prison and flogging

    Iranian director Mohammad Rasoulof escaped imminent imprisonment in Iran by discarding all trackable electronic devices and walking across a mountainous borderland on foot, the film-maker has told the Guardian in an exclusive interview.

    But even though he has found shelter in Germany and is optimistic about attending next week’s Cannes premiere of the film that nearly saw him jailed for eight years , Rasoulof said he still expects to return to his home country “quite soon” and sit out his sentence.

    Continue reading...
    • chevron_right

      Twilight of the Warriors: Walled In review – frenetic actioner in infamous Kowloon neighbourhood

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · 3 days ago - 08:00 · 1 minute

    Cannes film festival
    The choreography is impressive as people are hurled through walls, thrown off rooftops and otherwise beaten to a pulp, but the editing is frenetic and the characters cartoonish

    Hong Kong’s Kowloon Walled City – once the most densely populated place on Earth – is the perfect movie setting: a Piranesian labyrinth of squalid high rises and dark, cramped alleys, teeming with crooks, lowlifes, addicts and impoverished families running small businesses, legit and otherwise. This 1980s-set action epic lovingly, meticulously recreates the notorious neighbourhood (which was demolished in 1994), but sadly, the backdrop is more interesting than the story.

    At heart it’s a tale of a Chinese immigrant caught between rival gangs. Street fighter Chan Lok-kwan (Raymond Lam) is initially scammed by local triad boss Mr Big (a cigar-smoking caricature from veteran Jackie Chan sidekick Sammo Hung). Chan retaliates by stealing a package and, after a great bus-top chase scene, he stumbles accidentally into the Walled City, a no-go area for Mr Big’s goons as it’s ruled by local boss Cyclone (Louis Koo). As well as running a barber shop, and smoking like a chimney even though he is dying of a lung disease, Cyclone rules over the giant slum like a benign dictator, collecting rents but also looking out for its citizens and maintaining some kind of order. He and the rest of the Walled City community take Chan under their wing, and this hard-working orphan starts to feel at home for the first time – until a highly unlikely twist of fate puts all the factions on a path to all-out gang warfare.

    Continue reading...