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      Restaurateur Jeremy King continues comeback with opening of the Park

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Saturday, 22 June - 08:00

    After losing his empire in 2022, the lauded host is opening a ‘new world grand cafe’ in London’s Bayswater

    This month, Jeremy King will open the Park, an all-day restaurant in Bayswater. It is the second of three big 2024 openings for the lauded restaurateur, who was behind the heydays of some of London’s most celebrated restaurants such as Le Caprice, the Ivy and the Wolseley.

    It follows the launch of Arlington in January, King’s modern reboot of Le Caprice, once a favourite with the stars from Diana, Princess of Wales to Mick Jagger. Later in the year he’ll be reviving another stalwart, Simpson’s on the Strand.

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      Assaggini, Glasgow G12: ‘Until now, I thought “bad pizza” was a contradiction’ – restaurant review

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Friday, 21 June - 11:00 · 1 minute

    There’s a dramatic dichotomy between the restaurant this wants to be and the joint they’re actually running

    Finding hot new ways with pasta isn’t easy, but at Assaggini in Glasgow, they are confident that they’ve nailed it. Have you tried eating it on much smaller plates? Yes, these are words you’ve seen before – carbonara, gnocchi, spaghetti – but in tinier portions and with an onus on sharing them with the ones you love. Or perhaps the ones you no longer love, after you’ve split a plate of ravioli filled with chianti-braised beef with them, lingered while telling a story and found yourself left with just the brown butter and sage sauce.

    But if you can play nicely and share like a grownup, Assaggini is a lovely idea. The menu is genuinely exciting: 13 types of pasta and each one matched with a potential beer pairing. The carbonara goes with a St Mungo , a Glaswegian premium helles lager, while the ravioli is paired with Munich Red . These artisan ales are from West , an independent Scottish brewery that works in accordance with Reinheitsgebot , the German beer purity law of 1516. Touches such as this, plus Assaggini’s lengthy list of pizzas, salumi , fritt i and salads, make this whole affair feel like a futuristic Pizza Express built for a brave new world.

    On paper, it’s a vast all-day restaurant with a menu that solves all of your problems when feeding even the pickiest group. There’s pasta with straightforward tomato sauce and crocchett a di patat e with spicy mayo for the less adventurous. Alternatively, you can lose yourself in the menu with its maps, diagrams and delicious-sounding combinations, and go wild – girasoli , sunflower-shaped pasta stuffed with fresh ricotta and black truffle and served with pistacchio di Bronte maybe, or a round of frittatin a , deep-fried pasta with mortadella?

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      ‘It’s a flavour-bomb!’ The rise and rise of the dip

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Wednesday, 19 June - 11:00

    It started with tzatziki and taramasalata, now it’s all whipped feta and truffle hummus. How did Britain get such an appetite for the scoopable stuff?

    On 30 May 1987, Waitrose announced the introduction of a new range of dips: tzatziki, taramasalata and hummus. This was the first time they had appeared on supermarket shelves in the UK and they were so novel that they needed explaining. Hummus “is a traditional Middle Eastern hors d’oeuvre made with chickpeas and sesame seeds,” the label advised, under an illustration of palm trees and minarets. Fast forward 36 years, and our appetite for dips appears bottomless. They – and their partners in crime, crispy snacks – are a shopping basket and restaurant staple, and not a summer or Christmas goes by without a new limited-edition dip causing a storm online.

    They’ve become “mandatory”, says restaurateur David Carter, whose latest opening Oma has received rave reviews of its “showstopping” hummus.

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      Restaurants are dying and the Tories won’t save them. That’s why they won’t get my vote | Tom Kerridge

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Tuesday, 18 June - 13:08

    Food prices and lack of experienced staff are pushing the hospitality industry to ruin – we need fresh thinking

    When I opened the Hand and Flowers, the first pub in Britain to receive two Michelin stars, we scrimped, saved, maxed out our credit cards and held our breath. It was 2005, and the economic climate was very different back then. People had more money in their pockets, Britain was still a member of the EU, and a global pandemic would have seemed like a far-fetched nightmare.

    Today, I still firmly believe that if you have guts and determination, Britain can be a good place to open a restaurant or start a food business. But starting something is the easy part. Trying to keep that business open is now a different story altogether.

    Tom Kerridge is the chef-patron of the Hand and Flowers in Marlow, Buckinghamshire

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      pubsub.blastersklan.com / elnacional · Monday, 17 June - 08:52 edit · 2 minutes

    Gilda, anxoves, seitons, montaditos, taules d'embotits, croquetes, calamarsets, macarrons de l'àvia, truita de patates... Són clàssics de les tapes i la cuina de casa nostra que s'ajunten en un establiment a la zona de Sarrià - Sant Gervasi per doctorar-se en els platets sofisticats i la bona cuina casolana. Amb un espai interior senzill que combina les cadires amb els bancs i taules pensades per compartir en format cara a cara o per a grups, la terrassa a l'exterior és un punt a tenir en compte per gaudir d'aquestes tapes amb el sol i el bon temps.

    Bar Monry's: doctorar-se en tapes d'escàndol

    Ubicat al carrer Doctor Fleming de Barcelona, ​​el restaurant Bar Monry's es distingeix per oferir una gastronomia basada en platerets sofisticats i productes destacats. La selecció acurada d'ingredients reflecteix el compromís per l'excel·lència i l'autenticitat. El concepte se centra els montaditos de qualitat sense complicacions: alguns dels plats més representatius de la carta són els daus de filet amb patates i allioli casolà, un exquisit tàrtar de tonyina vermella, croquetes de pulled beef fumades, el carpaccio de gamba vermella de Blanes, tortitas de gambeta de Cadis i fins i tot pernil de gla 100% provinent de Guijuelo. Les postres són casolanes com el pastís de formatge i les llesques de brioix.

    Plats i tapes del restaurant Bar Monry's / Foto: Jordi Tubella
    Burrata trufada amb pernil ibèric / Foto: Jordi Tubella

    L'oferta culinària es complementa amb una selecció de vins de cellers tan representatius com l'Ànec Mut, El Pispa, Camins del Priorat i molts més, curosament escollits per realçar cada experiència gastronòmica. Vins catalans, però amb una notable presència també de vins espanyols i francesos. Negres, blancs, rosats, caves i sangries per glorificar un àpat sensacional.

    Plats i tapes del restaurant Bar Monry's / Foto: Jordi Tubella
    Croquetes de pulled beef fumada i de calamars a la tinta / Foto: Jordi Tubella

    A més, ara que ve l'època de terrasses, Bar Monry's ofereix també una cuidada oferta en destil·leria, perquè el client no només pugui gaudir del dinar, sinó també allargar amb unes bones copes a la tarda o després de sopar. En definitiva, menjar a un preu competitiu, estar a gust i sentir-te bé en un ambient despreocupat i per a tots els públics.

    Plats i tapes del restaurant Bar Monry's / Foto: Jordi Tubella
    Bastonets d'albergínia amb mel de canya / Foto: Jordi Tubella
    Plats i tapes del restaurant Bar Monry's / Foto: Jordi Tubella
    Una truita de patates molt sucosa i increïble / Foto: Jordi Tubella

    La filosofia de Bar Monry's és combinar cuina mediterrània i urbana amb un ambient informal. Amb un tiquet mitjà de 30 euros i una àmplia gamma d'opcions que s'estenen fins a 50 euros amb vi, Bar Monry's es posiciona com un destí rellevant a la zona per a un públic divers i exigent que busca degustar allò de tota la vida, però amb una cura i afecte brutal cap al producte i al bon menjar.

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    El restaurant de Sarrià-Sant Gervasi on doctorar-se amb unes tapes d'escàndol
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      Gaia, London: ‘Nosebleedingly expensive’ – restaurant review

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Sunday, 9 June - 05:00

    It describes itself as a ‘refined taverna’, but this Greek restaurant deserves more colourful language

    Gaia, 50 Dover Street, London W1S 4NY ( gaia-restaurants.com ). Starters £10-£55; mains £32-£230; desserts £14-£36; wines from £45

    Oliver Putnam, the washed-up Broadway director played by Martin Short in Only Murders in the Building , would adore Gaia, named after the goddess earth mother. Famously, Putnam lives on dips and Gaia is a veritable dip heaven. It starts with a dollop of soft, whipped, herb-flecked feta. That is followed by an indecently luscious taramasalata, like a savoury Chantilly, just begging to be scooped away with the accompanying hoop of still-warm sesame-crusted koulouri bread. There’s a fava bean dip, and a smoked aubergine dip and a tzatziki. Dip, my darlings. Dip like the wind. Mind you, the notoriously skint Putnam wouldn’t be able to access that which he so desires. For this is also dip heaven in that it can only be afforded by the gods; by those who can carelessly spend £12 on a thumb-high whorl of whipped cod’s roe.

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      On my radar: Billy Corgan’s cultural highlights

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Saturday, 8 June - 14:00

    The Smashing Pumpkins frontman on bonding with his son over Miyazaki, the genius of Mozart’s Requiem, and the world’s biggest Bozo the Clown collection

    Born in Chicago in 1967, Billy Corgan is the frontman of the Smashing Pumpkins. The band have released 12 studio albums, including Atum: A Rock Opera in Three Acts (2022–2023); he has also released music solo and with the supergroup Zwan. He owns the National Wrestling Alliance, and is the subject of US reality TV series Billy Corgan’s Adventures in Carnyland . Along with his wife, Chloe Mendel, he runs Madame Zuzu’s Tea House in Highland Park, Illinois. The Smashing Pumpkins are on the UK leg of their The World Is a Vampire tour until 14 June; tonight they play the O2 in London.

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      July, London W1: ‘A sort of M&S meal deal for Coutts cardholders’ – restaurant review | Grace Dent on restaurants

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Friday, 7 June - 11:00 · 1 minute

    A restaurant that exists only in the minds of its owners

    July , an Alsace-inspired restaurant, is a lovely idea, which is how all restaurants begin. Nobody, back in the blue-sky-thinking days of opening a joint, has ever planned to open a stinker. Restaurants are perilously expensive ventures. Pop stars KLF may once have burned £1m on Jura , but at least they got to go to bed afterwards. Hospitality, however, never sleeps, so if, like Solynka Dumas and Julian Oschmann, you are burning money by opening a 44-cover, all-day German/Swiss dining experience at the hectic end of London’s Charlotte Street, you’ll be pretty tied up.

    The pair’s new restaurant in the heart of Fitzrovia is decked out in sumptuous, sunset-hued suede and leather, and offers a list of low-intervention wines that’s apparently curated by that wine-world name du jour , Honey Spencer . July also splashed the cash on employing someone to take lovely snaps of its Alsace-themed fantasy menu, including yummy-looking breaded deep-fried munster , pork terrine, herb dumplings in broth, exquisite salads, lamb hearts with green sauce, and white asparagus with ham and hollandaise. The dreamy list goes on: at weekends, I’m told, there will be whole Fosse Meadow chickens with homemade mayo, which I imagined as a bit like Bob Fosse chickens, having danced wild and free, and built up plenty of lovely, tasty flesh.

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      Gerry’s Hot Sub Deli, London: ‘Take it very seriously indeed’ – restaurant review

      news.movim.eu / TheGuardian · Sunday, 2 June - 05:00

    At Gerry’s the sandwich is elevated to a noble art, so roll up your sleeves and get stuck in

    Gerry’s Hot Sub Deli , 50 Exmouth Market, London EC1R 4QE. Sandwiches £8.25-£13.50, poutine £6.75-£10.70, dessert £4.25, wine £6.95 a glass, beer £3.95 a half pint

    Happiness is a handful of lunch and dressing running down your forearms. Certainly, anything that demands to be eaten alongside a roll of kitchen paper deserves to be taken seriously. By these criteria, which I’ve just invented, but now cleave to like holy scripture, the food at Gerry’s Hot Subs on London’s Exmouth Market deserves to be taken very seriously indeed. Lunch there is messy. Prepare to wipe yourself down afterwards or even nip home for a shower. But my, it’s good. The fact is, everybody can make themselves a sandwich, but you don’t want just anybody to make one for you. The frame is so very tight: some form of bread as vehicle for everything else. It demands a compulsive interest in detail combined with a profound understanding of what will make for a single, multi-textured mouthful. Followed by another and another.

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