• Ar chevron_right

      The Linden Centre Shaxi Community Campus / Anderson Anderson Architecture + Atelier FUN

      blabla.movim.eu / archdaily-com:0 · Friday, 19 April - 06:00 edit

    © Zhang Yangyang © Zhang Yangyang
    • architects: Anderson Anderson Architecture
    • architects: Atelier FUN
    • Location: Shilongcun, Jianchuan County, Dali, Yunnan, China, 671302
    • Project Year: 2023
    • Photographs: Zhang Yangyang
    • Area: 1541.0 m2

    Read more »

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      Bits from the DPL

      pubsub.slavino.sk / bitsfromdeb · Tuesday, 2 April - 17:00 · 18 minutes

    Dear Debianites

    This morning I decided to just start writing Bits from DPL and send whatever I have by 18:00 local time. Here it is, barely proof read, along with all it's warts and grammar mistakes! It's slightly long and doesn't contain any critical information, so if you're not in the mood, don't feel compelled to read it!

    == Get ready for a new DPL! ==

    Soon, the voting period will start to elect our next DPL, and my time as DPL will come to an end. Reading the questions posted to the new candidates on [debian-vote], it takes quite a bit of restraint to not answer all of them myself, I think I can see how that aspect contributed to me being reeled in to running for DPL! In total I've done so 5 times (the first time I ran, Sam was elected!).

    Good luck to both [Andreas] and [Sruthi], our current DPL candidates! I've already started working on preparing handover, and there's multiple request from teams that have came in recently that will have to wait for the new term, so I hope they're both ready to hit the ground running!

    • [debian-vote] Mailing list: https://lists.debian.org/debian-vote/2024/03/threads.html
    • Platform: https://www.debian.org/vote/2024/platforms/tille [Anrea]
    • Platform: https://www.debian.org/vote/2024/platforms/srud [Sruthi]

    == Things that I wish could have gone better ==

    • Communication:

    Recently, I saw a t-shirt that read:

     Adulthood is saying, 'But after this week things will slow down a bit' over and over until you die.

    I can relate! With every task, crisis or deadline that appears, I think that once this is over, I'll have some more breathing space to get back to non-urgent, but important tasks. "Bits from the DPL" was something I really wanted to get right this last term, and clearly failed spectacularly. I have two long Bits from the DPL drafts that I never finished, I tend to have prioritised problems of the day over communication. With all the hindsight I have, I'm not sure which is better to prioritise, I do rate communication and transparency very highly and this is really the top thing that I wish I could've done better over the last four years.

    On that note, thanks to people who provided me with some kind words when I've mentioned this to them before. They pointed out that there are many other ways to communicate and be in touch with the community, and they mentioned that they thought that I did a good job with that.

    Since I'm still on communication, I think we can all learn to be more effective at it, since it's really so important for the project. Every time I publicly spoke about us spending more money, we got more donations. People out there really like to see how we invest funds in to Debian, instead of just making it heap up. DSA just spent a nice chunk on money on hardware, but we don't have very good visibility on it. It's one thing having it on a public line item in SPI's reporting, but it would be much more exciting if DSA could provide a write-up on all the cool hardware they're buying and what impact it would have on developers, and post it somewhere prominent like debian-devel-announce, Planet Debian or Bits from Debian (from the publicity team).

    I don't want to single out DSA there, it's difficult and affects many other teams. The Salsa CI team also spent a lot of resources (time and money wise) to extend testing on AMD GPUs and other AMD hardware. It's fantastic and interesting work, and really more people within the project and in the outside world should know about it!

    I'm not going to push my agendas to the next DPL, but I hope that they continue to encourage people to write about their work, and hopefully at some point we'll build enough excitement in doing so that it becomes a more normal part of our daily work.

    • Founding Debian as a standalone entity:

    This was my number one goal for the project this last term, which was a carried over item from my previous terms.

    I'm tempted to write everything out here, including the problem statement and our current predicaments, what kind of ground work needs to happen, likely constitutional changes that need to happen, and the nature of the GR that would be needed to make such a thing happen, but if I start with that, I might not finish this mail.

    In short, I 100% believe that this is still a very high ranking issue for Debian, and perhaps after my term I'd be in a better position to spend more time on this (hmm, is this an instance of "The grass is always better on the other side", or "Next week will go better until I die?"). Anyway, I'm willing to work with any future DPL on this, and perhaps it can in itself be a delegation tasked to properly explore all the options, and write up a report for the project that can lead to a GR.

    Overall, I'd rather have us take another few years and do this properly, rather than rush into something that is again difficult to change afterwards. So while I very much wish this could've been achieved in the last term, I can't say that I have any regrets here either.

    == My terms in a nutshell ==

    • COVID-19 and Debian 11 era:

    My first term in 2020 started just as the COVID-19 pandemic became known to spread globally. It was a tough year for everyone, and Debian wasn't immune against its effects either. Many of our contributors got sick, some have lost loved ones (my father passed away in March 2020 just after I became DPL), some have lost their jobs (or other earners in their household have) and the effects of social distancing took a mental and even physical health toll on many. In Debian, we tend to do really well when we get together in person to solve problems, and when DebConf20 got cancelled in person, we understood that that was necessary, but it was still more bad news in a year we had too much of it already.

    I can't remember if there was ever any kind of formal choice or discussion about this at any time, but the DebConf video team just kind of organically and spontaneously became the orga team for an online DebConf, and that lead to our first ever completely online DebConf. This was great on so many levels. We got to see each other's faces again, even though it was on screen. We had some teams talk to each other face to face for the first time in years, even though it was just on a Jitsi call. It had a lasting cultural change in Debian, some teams still have video meetings now, where they didn't do that before, and I think it's a good supplement to our other methods of communication.

    We also had a few online Mini-DebConfs that was fun, but DebConf21 was also online, and by then we all developed an online conference fatigue, and while it was another good online event overall, it did start to feel a bit like a zombieconf and after that, we had some really nice events from the Brazillians, but no big global online community events again. In my opinion online MiniDebConfs can be a great way to develop our community and we should spend some further energy into this, but hey! This isn't a platform so let me back out of talking about the future as I see it...

    Despite all the adversity that we faced together, the Debian 11 release ended up being quite good. It happened about a month or so later than what we ideally would've liked, but it was a solid release nonetheless. It turns out that for quite a few people, staying inside for a few months to focus on Debian bugs was quite productive, and Debian 11 ended up being a very polished release.

    During this time period we also had to deal with a previous Debian Developer that was expelled for his poor behaviour in Debian, who continued to harass members of the Debian project and in other free software communities after his expulsion. This ended up being quite a lot of work since we had to take legal action to protect our community, and eventually also get the police involved. I'm not going to give him the satisfaction by spending too much time talking about him, but you can read our official statement regarding Daniel Pocock here:

    https://www.debian.org/News/2021/20211117

    In late 2021 and early 2022 we also discussed our general resolution process, and had two consequent votes to address some issues that have affected past votes:

    • https://www.debian.org/vote/2021/vote_003
    • https://www.debian.org/vote/2022/vote_001

    In my first term I addressed our delegations that were a bit behind, by the end of my last term all delegation requests are up to date. There's still some work to do, but I'm feeling good that I get to hand this over to the next DPL in a very decent state. Delegation updates can be very deceiving, sometimes a delegation is completely re-written and it was just 1 or 2 hours of work. Other times, a delegation updated can contain one line that has changed or a change in one team member that was the result of days worth of discussion and hashing out differences.

    I also received quite a few requests either to host a service, or to pay a third-party directly for hosting. This was quite an admin nightmare, it either meant we had to manually do monthly reimbursements to someone, or have our TOs create accounts/agreements at the multiple providers that people use. So, after talking to a few people about this, we founded the DebianNet team (we could've admittedly chosen a better name, but that can happen later on) for providing hosting at two different hosting providers that we have agreement with so that people who host things under debian.net have an easy way to host it, and then at the same time Debian also has more control if a site maintainer goes MIA.

    More info:

    https://wiki.debian.org/Teams/DebianNet

    You might notice some Openstack mentioned there, we had some intention to set up a Debian cloud for hosting these things, that could also be used for other additional Debiany things like archive rebuilds, but these have so far fallen through. We still consider it a good idea and hopefully it will work out some other time (if you're a large company who can sponsor few racks and servers, please get in touch!)

    • DebConf22 and Debian 12 era:

    DebConf22 was the first time we returned to an in-person DebConf. It was a bit smaller than our usual DebConf - understandably so, considering that there were still COVID risks and people who were at high risk or who had family with high risk factors did the sensible thing and stayed home.

    After watching many MiniDebConfs online, I also attended my first ever MiniDebConf in Hamburg. It still feels odd typing that, it feels like I should've been at one before, but my location makes attending them difficult (on a side-note, a few of us are working on bootstrapping a South African Debian community and hopefully we can pull off MiniDebConf in South Africa later this year).

    While I was at the MiniDebConf, I gave a talk where I covered the evolution of firmware, from the simple e-proms that you'd find in old printers to the complicated firmware in modern GPUs that basically contain complete operating systems- complete with drivers for the device their running on. I also showed my shiny new laptop, and explained that it's impossible to install that laptop without non-free firmware (you'd get a black display on d-i or Debian live). Also that you couldn't even use an accessibility mode with audio since even that depends on non-free firmware these days.

    Steve, from the image building team, has said for a while that we need to do a GR to vote for this, and after more discussion at DebConf, I kept nudging him to propose the GR, and we ended up voting in favour of it. I do believe that someone out there should be campaigning for more free firmware (unfortunately in Debian we just don't have the resources for this), but, I'm glad that we have the firmware included. In the end, the choice comes down to whether we still want Debian to be installable on mainstream bare-metal hardware.

    At this point, I'd like to give a special thanks to the ftpmasters, image building team and the installer team who worked really hard to get the changes done that were needed in order to make this happen for Debian 12, and for being really proactive for remaining niggles that was solved by the time Debian 12.1 was released.

    The included firmware contributed to Debian 12 being a huge success, but it wasn't the only factor. I had a list of personal peeves, and as the hard freeze hit, I lost hope that these would be fixed and made peace with the fact that Debian 12 would release with those bugs. I'm glad that lots of people proved me wrong and also proved that it's never to late to fix bugs, everything on my list got eliminated by the time final freeze hit, which was great! We usually aim to have a release ready about 2 years after the previous release, sometimes there are complications during a freeze and it can take a bit longer. But due to the excellent co-ordination of the release team and heavy lifting from many DDs, the Debian 12 release happened 21 months and 3 weeks after the Debian 11 release. I hope the work from the release team continues to pay off so that we can achieve their goals of having shorter and less painful freezes in the future!

    Even though many things were going well, the ongoing usr-merge effort highlighted some social problems within our processes. I started typing out the whole history of usrmerge here, but it's going to be too long for the purpose of this mail. Important questions that did come out of this is, should core Debian packages be team maintained? And also about how far the CTTE should really be able to override a maintainer. We had lots of discussion about this at DebConf22, but didn't make much concrete progress. I think that at some point we'll probably have a GR about package maintenance. Also, thank you to Guillem who very patiently explained a few things to me (after probably having have to done so many times to others before already) and to Helmut who have done the same during the MiniDebConf in Hamburg. I think all the technical and social issues here are fixable, it will just take some time and patience and I have lots of confidence in everyone involved.

    UsrMerge wiki page: https://wiki.debian.org/UsrMerge

    • DebConf 23 and Debian 13 era:

    DebConf23 took place in Kochi, India. At the end of my Bits from the DPL talk there, someone asked me what the most difficult thing I had to do was during my terms as DPL. I answered that nothing particular stood out, and even the most difficult tasks ended up being rewarding to work on. Little did I know that my most difficult period of being DPL was just about to follow. During the day trip, one of our contributors, Abraham Raji, passed away in a tragic accident. There's really not anything anyone could've done to predict or stop it, but it was devastating to many of us, especially the people closest to him. Quite a number of DebConf attendees went to his funeral, wearing the DebConf t-shirts he designed as a tribute. It still haunts me when I saw his mother scream "He was my everything! He was my everything!", this was by a large margin the hardest day I've ever had in Debian, and I really wasn't ok for even a few weeks after that and I think the hurt will be with many of us for some time to come. So, a plea again to everyone, please take care of yourself! There's probably more people that love you than you realise.

    A special thanks to the DebConf23 team, who did a really good job despite all the uphills they faced (and there were many!).

    As DPL, I think that planning for a DebConf is near to impossible, all you can do is show up and just jump into things. I planned to work with Enrico to finish up something that will hopefully save future DPLs some time, and that is a web-based DD certificate creator instead of having the DPL do so manually using LaTeX. It already mostly works, you can see the work so far by visiting https://nm.debian.org/person/ACCOUNTNAME/certificate/ and replacing ACCOUNTNAME with your Debian account name, and if you're a DD, you should see your certificate. It still needs a few minor changes and a DPL signature, but at this point I think that will be finished up when the new DPL start. Thanks to Enrico for working on this!

    Since my first term, I've been trying to find ways to improve all our accounting/finance issues. Tracking what we spend on things, and getting an annual overview is hard, especially over 3 trusted organisations. The reimbursement process can also be really tedious, especially when you have to provide files in a certain order and combine them into a PDF. So, at DebConf22 we had a meeting along with the treasurer team and Stefano Rivera who said that it might be possible for him to work on a new system as part of his Freexian work. It worked out, and Freexian funded the development of the system since then, and after DebConf23 we handled the reimbursements for the conference via the new reimbursements site:

    https://reimbursements.debian.net

    It's still early days, but over time it should be linked to all our TOs and we'll use the same category codes across the board. So, overall, our reimbursement process becomes a lot simpler, and also we'll be able to get information like how much money we've spent on any category in any period. It will also help us to track how much money we have available or how much we spend on recurring costs. Right now that needs manual polling from our TOs. So I'm really glad that this is a big long-standing problem in the project that is being fixed.

    For Debian 13, we're waving goodbye to the KFreeBSD and mipsel ports. But we're also gaining riscv64 and loongarch64 as release architectures! I have 3 different RISC-V based machines on my desk here that I haven't had much time to work with yet, you can expect some blog posts about them soon after my DPL term ends!

    As Debian is a unix-like system, we're affected by the [Year 2038 problem], where systems that uses 32 bit time in seconds since 1970 run out of available time and will wrap back to 1970 or have other undefined behaviour. A detailed [wiki page] explains how this works in Debian, and currently we're going through a rather large transition to make this possible.

    [Year 2038 problem] https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_2038_problem [wiki page] https://wiki.debian.org/ReleaseGoals/64bit-time

    I believe this is the right time for Debian to be addressing this, we're still a bit more than a year away for the Debian 13 release, and this provides enough time to test the implementation before 2038 rolls along.

    Of course, big complicated transitions with dependency loops that causes chaos for everyone would still be too easy, so this past weekend (which is a holiday period in most of the west due to Easter weekend) has been filled with dealing with an upstream bug in xz-utils, where a backdoor was placed in this key piece of software. An [Ars Technica] covers it quite well, so I won't go into all the details here. I mention it because I want to give yet another special thanks to everyone involved in dealing with this on the Debian side. Everyone involved, from the ftpmasters to security team and others involved were super calm and professional and made quick, high quality decisions. This also lead to the archive being frozen on Saturday, this is the first time I've seen this happen since I've been a DD, but I'm sure next week will go better!

    [Ars Technica] https://arstechnica.com/security/2024/04/what-we-know-about-the-xz-utils-backdoor-that-almost-infected-the-world/

    == Looking forward ==

    It's really been an honour for me to serve as DPL. It might well be my biggest achievement in my life. Previous DPLs range from prominent software engineers to game developers, or people who have done things like complete Iron Man, run other huge open source projects and are part of big consortiums. Ian Jackson even authored dpkg and is now working on the very interesting [tag2upload service]!

    [tag2upload service] https://peertube.debian.social/w/pav68XBWdurWzfTYvDgWRM

    I'm a relative nobody, just someone who grew up as a poor kid in South Africa, who just really cares about Debian a lot. And, above all, I'm really thankful that I didn't do anything major to screw up Debian for good.

    Not unlike learning how to use Debian, and also becoming a Debian Developer, I've learned a lot from this and it's been a really valuable growth experience for me.

    I know I can't possible give all the thanks to everyone who deserves it, so here's a big big thanks to everyone who have worked so hard and who have put in many, many hours to making Debian better, I consider you all heroes!

    -Jonathan


    Značky: #covid19, #community, #election, #resolutions, #Debian, #dpl, #debconf, #thefuture, #usrmerge

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      Community quitte Netflix : où regarder la série en streaming maintenant ?

      news.movim.eu / Numerama · Monday, 18 March - 09:04

    La célèbre sitcom de 6 saisons Community quitte très bientôt le catalogue Netflix. Mais pas de panique, la série reste disponible en streaming en France.

    • chevron_right

      5 séries comiques réconfortantes à voir sur Prime Video

      news.movim.eu / Numerama · Wednesday, 27 December - 08:00

    Vous avez envie de garder une ambiance cocooning, juste après la folie de Noël ? Voici donc 5 séries parfaites pour vous réchauffer le cœur : Community, This is Us, Young Sheldon, The Marvelous Mrs Maisel et One Mississippi.

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      Daniel Gultsch: "Der Angriff auf jabber.ru und mögliche Gegenmaßnahmen"

      debacle · pubsub.movim.eu / berlin-xmpp-meetup · Monday, 11 December - 09:47 edit · 4 visibility

    Daniel Gultsch: "Der Angriff auf jabber.ru und mögliche Gegenmaßnahmen"

    When? Wednesday, 2023-12-13 18:00 CET (always 2ⁿᵈ Wednesday of every month)

    Where? In xHain hack+makespace, Grünberger Str. 16, 10243 Berlin

    This time it is a face-to-face meeting. Find out about a recording at our virtual meeting place xmpp:berlin-meetup@conference.conversations.im?join.

    #Jabber #XMPP #freeSoftware #community #xHain #Berlin #meetup #community #jabberRU #security #MitM

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      MattJ talks about "Spam, Abuse and Moderation"

      debacle · pubsub.movim.eu / berlin-xmpp-meetup · Monday, 6 November, 2023 - 23:33 edit · 4 visibility

    MattJ talks about "Spam, Abuse and Moderation"

    When? Wednesday, 2023-11-08 18:00 CET (always 2ⁿᵈ Wednesday of every month)

    Where? In xHain hack+makespace, Grünberger Str. 16, 10243 Berlin

    This time it is a hybrid meeting. Find out about our Jitsi at our virtual meeting place xmpp:berlin-meetup@conference.conversations.im?join.

    #Jabber #XMPP #freeSoftware #community #xHain #Berlin #meetup #community #xhain #spam #abuse #moderation

    • chevron_right

      hrxi talks about "Dino on Windows"

      debacle · pubsub.movim.eu / berlin-xmpp-meetup · Monday, 9 October, 2023 - 16:23 edit · 3 visibility

    hrxi talks about "Dino on Windows"

    When? Wednesday, 2023-10-11 18:00 CEST (always 2ⁿᵈ Wednesday of every month)

    Where? In xHain hack+makespace, Grünberger Str. 16, 10243 Berlin

    This time it is a physical meeting, no Jitsi, sorry!

    You might like to join our virtual meeting place xmpp:berlin-meetup@conference.conversations.im?join.

    #Jabber #XMPP #freeSoftware #community #xHain #Dino #Windows #Berlin #meetup #community #xhain

    • Ja chevron_right

      Figuring out the rules at a Japanese community pool can be an ongoing education

      pubsub.blastersklan.com / japan_times · Monday, 17 July, 2023 - 00:25 edit

    If you’re headed for the community pool, be prepared: Japanese pool rules are an ongoing education.

    • wifi_tethering open_in_new

      This post is public

      www.japantimes.co.jp /community/2023/07/17/voices/figuring-rules-japanese-community-pool-can-ongoing-education/

    • Ja chevron_right

      Peacemaking of a different sort in Okinawa

      pubsub.blastersklan.com / japan_times · Sunday, 2 July, 2023 - 04:10 edit

    Through therapy and community outreach, counseling service TELL draws on the personal experiences of its clinicians and support workers to help various communities in Okinawa.