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      pubsub.blastersklan.com / slashdot · Monday, 18 March - 03:43 edit · 3 minutes

    Databricks CTO Matei Zaharia "said that Databricks had to keep track of scheduling a million things," remembers adjunct MIT professor Michael Stonebraker. " He said that this can't be done with traditional operating system scheduling, and so this was done out of a Postgres database. And then he started to whine that Postgres was too slow, and I told him we can do better than that...." This resulted in DBOS — short for "database operating system" — which they teamed up to build with teams Stanford and MIT, according to The Next Platform: They founded a company to commercialize the idea in April 2023 and secured $8.5 million initial seed funding to start building the real DBOS. Engine Ventures and Construct Capital led the funding, along with Sinewave and GutBrain Ventures... "The state that the operating system has to keep track of — memory, files, messages, and so on — is approximately linear to the resources you have got," says Stonebraker. "So without me saying another word, keeping track of operating system state is a database problem not addressed by current operating system schedulers. Moreover, OLTP [Online Transaction Processing] database performance has gone up dramatically, and that is why we thought instead of running the database system in user space on top of the operating system, why don't we invert our thinking 180 degrees and run the operating system on top of the database, with all of the operating services are coded in SQL...?" For now, DBOS can give the same kind of performance as that full blown Linux operating system, and thanks to the distributed database underpinnings of its kernel, it can do things that a Linux kernel just cannot do... One is provide reliable execution, which means that if a program running atop DBOS is ever interrupted, it starts where it left off and does not have to redo its work from some arbitrary earlier point and does not crash and have to start from the beginning. And because every little bit of the state of the operating system — and therefore the applications that run atop it — is preserved, you can go backwards in time in the system and restart the operating system if it experiences some sort of anomaly, such as a bad piece of application software running or a hack attack. You can use this "time travel" feature, as Stonebraker calls it, to reproduce what are called heisenbugs — ones that are very hard to reproduce precisely because there is no shared state in the distributed Linux and Kubernetes environment and that are increasingly prevalent in a world of microservices. The other benefit of the DBOS is that it presents a smaller attack surface for hackers, which boosts security, and that you analyze the metrics of the operating system in place since they are already in a NoSQL database that can be queried rather than aggregating a bunch of log files from up and down the software stack to try to figure out what is going on... There is also a custom tier for DBOS, which we presume costs money, that can use other databases and datastores for user application data, stores more than three days of log data, can have multiple users per account, that adds email and Slack support with DBOS techies, and that is available on other clouds as well as AWS. The operating system kernel/scheduler "is itself largely a database," with services written in TypeScript, according to the article. The first iteration used the FoundationDB distributed key-value store for its scheduling core (open sourced by Apple in 2018), according to the article — "a blazingly fast NoSQL database... Stonebraker says there is no reason to believe that DBOS can't scale across 1 million cores or more and support Java, Python, and other application languages as they are needed by customers..." And the article speculates they could take things even further. "There is no reason why DBOS cannot complete the circle and not only have a database as an operating system kernel, but also have a relational database as the file system for applications."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Database-Based Operating System 'DBOS' Does Things Linux Can't
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      Zilliz Cloud boosts vector database performance

      pubsub.slavino.sk / infoworldcom · Wednesday, 31 January - 20:40 edit

    San Francisco-based Zilliz has released a new version of its database-as-a-service (DBaaS) offering, Zilliz Cloud. The company claims the new version offers better performance while reducing cost of ownership compared to its previous version.

    Zilliz Cloud is built atop the open source Milvus vector database management system . Zilliz was founded by engineers who had helped develop the Milvus vector database.

    The new version of Zilliz Cloud, according to the company, offers 10x better performance than the original Milvus vector database. This is achieved by using the Hierarchical Navigable Small World (HNSW) graph index in combination with an improved filtered search.

    To read this article in full, please click here


    Značky: #Rozne, #Database

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      Toad Data Studio manages SQL, NoSQL, and cloud databases

      pubsub.slavino.sk / infoworldcom · Thursday, 18 January - 10:00 edit

    Systems management and security software provider Quest Software is shipping Toad Data Studio, a platform for streamlining database management in heterogeneous relational and NoSQL database environments.

    Announced January 17, Toad Data Studio allows users to manage nearly any database platform in their environment including cloud and on-premises sources and relational, NoSQL, and data warehouse sources, Quest Software said. A free trial is offered.

    Toad Data Studio features an advanced SQL editor, SQL and DDL generation, and the ability to edit JSON and XML fields directly within table fields or in their own separate editing window. Users can compare data results across different queries or between different environments, either on the fly or through automated workflows, and develop desktop automations for routine tasks.

    To read this article in full, please click here


    Značky: #JSON, #SQL, #Rozne, #Database

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      Pinecone’s new serverless database may see few takers, analysts say

      pubsub.slavino.sk / infoworldcom · Wednesday, 17 January - 18:00 edit

    There might be few takers for Pinecone’s new serverless vector database , dubbed Pinecone Serverless, analysts believe.

    “Why set up and administer a separate database—even one with the advantages of serverless scalability—if you can get the same functionality from the database you are already using and in which you are already managing your data?”, said Doug Henschen, principal analyst at Constellation Research.

    Other than mainstream vector databases , such as Milvus, Weaviate, and Chroma, vector embedding and search features have either already been added or are coming soon to database service providers, including MongoDB , Couchbase , Snowflake , and Google BigQuery , among others.

    To read this article in full, please click here


    Značky: #Database, #Rozne

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      AWS is readying LLM-based debugger for databases to take on OpenAI

      pubsub.slavino.sk / infoworldcom · Monday, 15 January - 12:45 edit

    AWS researchers are working on developing a large language model -based debugger for databases in an effort to help enterprises solve performance issues in such systems.

    Dubbed Panda, the new debugging framework has been designed to work in a manner that is similar to a database engineer (DBE), the company wrote in a blog post , adding that troubleshooting performance issues in a database can be “notoriously hard.”

    To read this article in full, please click here


    Značky: #Rozne, #Database

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      AWS readying LLM-based debugger for databases to take on OpenAI

      pubsub.slavino.sk / infoworldcom · Monday, 15 January - 12:45 edit

    AWS researchers are working on developing a large language model -based debugger for databases in an effort to help enterprises solve performance issues in such systems.

    Dubbed Panda, the new debugging framework has been designed to work in a manner that is similar to a database engineer (DBE), the company wrote in a blog post , adding that troubleshooting performance issues in a database can be “notoriously hard.”

    To read this article in full, please click here


    Značky: #Database, #Rozne

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      Oracle introduces JavaScript support in MySQL

      pubsub.slavino.sk / infoworldcom · Wednesday, 3 January - 22:30 edit

    Oracle has introduced JavaScript support in the MySQL database, allowing developers to write JavaScript stored programs, i.e. JavaScript functions and procedures, in the MySQL database server.

    The capability was announced on December 15, 2023 . The JavaScript stored programs will be run with the GraalVM , which provides an ECMAScript-compliant runtime to execute JavaScript programs. Developers can access this MySQL-JavaScript capability in a preview in MySQL Enterprise Edition, which can be downloaded via Oracle Technology Network (OTN) . MySQL-JavaScript also is offered in the MySQL Heatwave cloud service in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI), AWS, and Microsoft Azure.

    To read this article in full, please click here


    Značky: #JavaScript, #MySQL, #Database, #Rozne

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      SQL unleashed: 9 ways to speed up your SQL queries

      pubsub.slavino.sk / infoworldcom · Wednesday, 20 December - 10:00 edit

    SQL is the leading language for developing and querying databases , but it has a few quirks. In my last article, I shared 7 SQL mistakes to avoid . Now, let's take a look at 9 best practices for writing faster SQL queries.

    9 best practices for faster SQL queries

    1. Retrieve only the columns you need
    2. Use CASE instead of UPDATE for conditional column updates
    3. Keep large-table queries to a minimum
    4. Pre-stage your data
    5. Perform deletes and updates in batches
    6. Use temp tables to improve cursor performance
    7. Use table-valued functions over scalar functions
    8. Use partitioning to avoid large data moves
    9. Use stored procedures for performance, use ORMs for convenience

    Retrieve only the columns you need

    A common SQL habit is to use SELECT * on a query, because it's tedious to list all the columns you need. Plus, sometimes those columns may change over time, so why not just do things the easy way?

    To read this article in full, please click here


    Značky: #SQL, #Database, #Rozne

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      Java persistence with JPA and Hibernate: Entities and relationships

      pubsub.slavino.sk / infoworldcom · Wednesday, 20 December - 10:00 edit

    The Jakarta Persistence API (JPA) is a Java specification that bridges the gap between relational databases and object-oriented programming. This two-part tutorial introduces JPA and explains how Java objects are modeled as JPA entities, how entity relationships are defined, and how to use JPA's EntityManager with the Repository pattern in your Java applications. This gives you all the basics for saving and loading application state.

    Note that this tutorial uses Hibernate as the JPA provider. Most concepts can be extended to other Java persistence frameworks.

    To read this article in full, please click here


    Značky: #Database, #Rozne, #Java